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  • Why isn't more being done to find cure for incontinence?

    Why isn't more being done to find cure for incontinence?

    For a chronic health condition that causes shame and misery for countless people and costs billions, urinary incontinence keeps a low profile. Media reports about chronic health conditions appear with alarming regularity, but it is rare to read...

  • Ultra-processed foods could increase cancer risk

    Ultra-processed foods could increase cancer risk

    Ultra-processed foods such as fizzy drinks, packaged bread and cake, cereal and processed meats could increase the risk of cancer, according to a new study. Processed foods make up to 50 percent of the average person's diet in some developed...

  • Why we value diamond rings and other Valentine's Day gifts

    Why we value diamond rings and other Valentine's Day gifts

    According to an American Express report, more than six million US couples are expected to get engaged on Valentine’s Day. Pexels   “Diamonds are a girls best friend”, so the saying goes. These shiny rocks are durable and pricey. And on...

  • Study finds communities shape men's attitude towards women and sex

    Study finds communities shape men's attitude towards women and sex

    The communities in which men live play a fundamental role in shaping their attitudes towards women and sex, researchers have found. A two-year study conducted in poorer areas across Scotland looked at the influence of a person's surroundings on...

  • Hand washing can actually lower mortality in nursing homes

    Hand washing can actually lower mortality in nursing homes

    Infection prevention practices centred on hand hygiene protocols can save lives across all healthcare facilities, not just hospital settings. This includes nursing homes, according to a new study published in the February issue of the American...

  • Enzyme study offers new hope for Alzheimer's

    Enzyme study offers new hope for Alzheimer's

    Clinical signs of Alzheimer's have been completely reversed by scientists targeting a specific brain protein, raising hopes of an effective treatment for the disease. The US team bred Alzheimer's-prone laboratory mice whose levels of the protein,...

  • Scientists develop new material for controversial vaginal mesh implants

    Scientists develop new material for controversial vaginal mesh implants

    Scientists believe they have come up with an alternative to the material used in vaginal mesh implants which prompted a huge number of women to complain they had been left in severe pain. Mesh treatment has been offered in cases of pelvic organ...

  • Butterflies are free

    Butterflies are free

    Malta rarely features in the grand scheme of things. But Daphne Caruana Galizia’s assassination sent shockwaves and resonated across the world. Two Frenchwomen felt their lives were so affected by this brutal killing that they wanted to pay...

  • Measles cases in the EU treble in 2017

    Measles cases in the EU treble in 2017

    The number of measles cases in the EU has trebled in just one year, according to the European Centre for Disease Control. In 2017, 14,451 measles cases were reported, three times the number of cases reported in 2016 (4 643). The highest number of...

  • Medieval skeletons reveal some truths about childhood puberty

    Medieval skeletons reveal some truths about childhood puberty

    Children are entering puberty younger than before, according to recent studies, raising concerns that childhood obesity and hormone-contaminated water supplies may be to blame. However, our archaeological research suggests that there’s nothing to...

  • Woman infected with eye worm known only in cattle

    Woman infected with eye worm known only in cattle

    An Oregon woman has become the first person worldwide known to have had an eye infestation by a tiny worm species previously seen only in cattle, an indication that humans may be more vulnerable than previously thought to such infections. Lisa...

  • ‘Carnival is part of who we are’

    ‘Carnival is part of who we are’

    Carnival this year attracted a record number of participants in the dancing competitions, with more than 20 companies and 15 dance schools taking part. Marvic Aquilina, 41, said she loved dancing in carnival and had been taking part ever since she...

  • Slow eating may stem weight gain, study finds

    Slow eating may stem weight gain, study finds

    Slow eating could be the key to losing weight, a new study suggests. Cutting out after-dinner snacks and avoiding late meals are also linked to people shedding the pounds, researchers found. The new study, published in the journal BMJ Open, saw...

  • Having a tattoo of your lover's name has been a bad idea for hundreds of years

    Having a tattoo of your lover's name has been a bad idea for hundreds of years

    Every Valentine’s Day we are reminded about the importance of showing our commitment to our lovers – whether we are married to them or not. For some people this might mean getting a tattoo of their lover’s name (or initials). No figures are...

  • More than just seizures

    More than just seizures

    Over 4,000 people in Malta suffer from epilepsy. On International Epilepsy Day, Caritas Malta Epilepsy Association says that the chronic neurological condition affects all aspects of a person’s life but that the prevailing stigma is sometimes more...

  • Racism forced me out of my native Malta without one of my daughters

    Racism forced me out of my native Malta without one of my daughters

    You cannot explain Africa. To visit is to have all senses overwhelmed in one breath. Cattle bells ring on street corners and sunset-red dust scatters from taxis hurtling past. Women swathed in rainbow-coloured cloth sway with baskets of fish atop...

  • Citrus fruits, scurvy and the origins of the Sicilian mafia

    Citrus fruits, scurvy and the origins of the Sicilian mafia

    Petr Jilek via Shutterstock   The Sicilian mafia is arguably one of the most famous – or infamous – institutions in the Western world. After its first appearance in Sicily in the 1870s it soon infiltrated the economic and political spheres of...

  • Three reasons why scientific advice on drugs is ignored

    Three reasons why scientific advice on drugs is ignored

    Syda Productions/Shutterstock   David Nutt, along with many other leading scientists, published a study a few years ago that showed how the overall harms associated with some legal drugs, such as alcohol and tobacco, dramatically exceed the harms...

  • Pietru Pawl Caruana painting regains its original momentum

    Pietru Pawl Caruana painting regains its original momentum

    Conservator Agatha Grima gives a glimpse of what was involved in the restoration and conservation of Pietru Pawl Caruana’s apse painting in the choir area at the Basilica of Our Lady of Porto Salvo (Our Lady of Fair Havens), also known as the...

  • Half a century and counting

    Half a century and counting

    Interviewing three couples, who, between them, have almost 200 years’ worth of marriage experience, is not all laughter and roses. Their words of wisdom are not about how they have kept the romance alive after all these years – they did not tell...