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  • Come join us for coffee, young Catholics urge the Church

    Come join us for coffee, young Catholics urge the Church

    It might be called Cappuccino Catholicism. Young Catholics told their Church elders on Saturday that the faith should be spread in the places where they like to hang out, such as coffee bars. "We would like the Church to meet us in the various...

  • Irish stew on the menu as Harry and Meghan visit Belfast's crown liquor saloon

    Irish stew on the menu as Harry and Meghan visit Belfast's crown liquor saloon

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry embraced the culture of Northern Ireland during a visit to one of Belfast's most famous buildings - by sitting down to a traditional Irish pub lunch. The American actress and her fiance, on a whirlwind trip to the...

  • Victoria's Secret model Sara Sampaio: I felt violated over revealing photos

    Victoria's Secret model Sara Sampaio: I felt violated over revealing photos

    Victoria's Secret model Sara Sampaio has said she felt "violated" after a French magazine published topless photos of her. The catwalk star said she had signed a no-nudity agreement before the revealing picture was used on the cover of the...

  • Markle's wedding ring expected to follow royal tradition of Welsh gold

    Markle's wedding ring expected to follow royal tradition of Welsh gold

    When Britain's Prince Harry marries Meghan Markle in May he is expected to follow a royal tradition started nearly 100 years ago of using a wedding band of Welsh gold. His great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, was the first to use...

  • Millions more hungry in 2017 amid famine, conflict, and numbers rising-report

    Millions more hungry in 2017 amid famine, conflict, and numbers rising-report

    Conflicts and climate disasters, particularly drought, drove the number of people facing crisis levels of hunger up by about 15 percent last year and the situation is getting worse, a report said on Thursday. Last year 124 million people in 51...

  • Ġużi is not there

    Ġużi is not there

    The late Joseph Caruana, Ġużi to the neighbourhood, ran a grocery store in St Julian’s for 45 years. Dominic Fenech recalls the man behind the counter, who was much more than just a vendor. Is Ġużi there, my wife and I would sometimes ask each other.

  • Flashback to Gozo’s 1855 agricultural show

    Flashback to Gozo’s 1855 agricultural show

    A depiction of the first Wirja ta’ Santa Marija (Holy Mary Exhibition) in 1855 is the star attraction of an exhibition of watercolours and pen drawings by notary Antonio Portelli to be held at the National Archives of Gozo. In the 1850s, Sir...

  • Frank Portelli’s monumental Senglea dome

    Frank Portelli’s monumental Senglea dome

    The popular concept of a ‘properly-dressed’ church in Malta is typically baroque, with an emphasis on varied adornment in rich materials, sculptural decorations and paintings. Naturally, this is partly due to the prevalence of baroque...

  • Peer-mentoring in Education for Sustainable Development

    Peer-mentoring in Education for Sustainable Development

    Teaching is definitely a stressful job. A recent article in the UK Times Educational Supplement (Tes), claimed that teachers in the UK are twice more likely to suffer work-related stress than average, while ABC News reported teaching as the fourth...

  • Myth debunked: Can humans be double-jointed?

    Myth debunked: Can humans be double-jointed?

    Everyone has heard of someone who claims to be double-jointed and is able to pull their thumb to their forearm. While this is not considered that much out of the ordinary, there is no such thing as being double-jointed. Two bones meet at a joint...

  • Photo of the week

    Photo of the week

    The Fawwara Centre is a multipurpose education and research centre managed by the Centre for Environmental Education and Research (CEER). The space is a site for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and a place for research on environmental...

  • Can 3D-printed houses provide cheap, safe homes for the world's poor?

    Can 3D-printed houses provide cheap, safe homes for the world's poor?

    Dozens of families living in El Salvador's slums hope to swap their makeshift wooden shacks for concrete 3D-printed houses next year, in what developers say is the first project of its kind in the world. ICON, a Texas-based construction technology...

  • Development threatens Latin America's great Pantanal wetlands

    Development threatens Latin America's great Pantanal wetlands

    You can only just hear the murmur of running water through Plinia Rodrigues' vegetable garden, but that tiny stream has a huge job: keeping alive Latin America's mammoth wetlands, known as the Pantanal. Rodrigues, 63, shows off the thick stands of...

  • 700 years added to Malta’s history

    700 years added to Malta’s history

    Research being presented in Malta tomorrow reveals that the first inhabitants of our islands were robust and healthy and survived harsh climate conditions. Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast dig into the data. Researchers at Queen’s...

  • Celebrated dino-bird Archaeopteryx could fly, but not very well

    Celebrated dino-bird Archaeopteryx could fly, but not very well

    It may not have been a champion aviator, but the famous dino-bird Archaeopteryx was fully capable of flying despite key skeletal differences from its modern cousins, though not exactly gracefully, according to a new study. Think Wright Brothers,...

  • A Thatcher moment? France's Macron squares off with rail unions

    A Thatcher moment? France's Macron squares off with rail unions

    The last time a French president squared off against rail unions over workers' benefits it ended badly. The strikes of 1995 paralysed Paris and forced prime minister Alain Juppe to pull the reforms, a defeat from which he failed to...

  • Secrets of the brain

    Secrets of the brain

    The brain is the foremost frontier of biomedical research and one of the most challenging areas in all the sciences. Only by revealing the secrets of the brain and its functions will it be possible to change the lives of millions of people of all...

  • Nightmare neighbours among top reasons to move

    Nightmare neighbours among top reasons to move

    Nightmare neighbours are among the top reasons why people are looking to move home, a survey has found. Lifestyle issues are the biggest drivers for people upping sticks rather than making financial gains from the property market, the research...

  • Ageing Japan: Prisons cope with swelling ranks of elderly inmates

    Ageing Japan: Prisons cope with swelling ranks of elderly inmates

    A gaunt, 92-year-old man in a wheelchair sunbathes in a narrow courtyard, motionless, his eyes closed. Nearby, a few dozen other elderly men with short grey hair exercise slowly as an instructor gently calls out, "Don't strain yourselves." The man...

  • From the pyramids to Stonehenge – were prehistoric people astronomers?

    From the pyramids to Stonehenge – were prehistoric people astronomers?

    Astronomy is often described as the oldest of the sciences, inspiring people for thousands of years. Celestial phenomena are featured in prehistoric cave paintings. And monuments such as the Great Pyramids of Giza and Stonehenge seem to be aligned...