Advert

Features

  • Photo of the week

    Photo of the week

    The hyperboloid structure of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium of the Saint Louis Science Centre in Missouri, built in 1963 and designed by Gyo Obata of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum. A hyperboloid is generated by rotating a hyperbola (one of the...

  • The indefatigable Diana

    The indefatigable Diana

    The glitterati primed for their close-ups blanketed the red carpet for a fanfare evening of landmark hip-hop musical Hamilton. There was much air kissing and flash-bang-wallop-what-a-picture as the regenerated Dr Who Jodie Whitaker mingled with...

  • 'Patients are not numbers'

    'Patients are not numbers'

    Diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, which she left under the radar for too long, Dr Tania van Avendonk moved from professional carer to also being cared for; to a patient, not just their doctor… Having moved also between anger, fear, regret, calm...

  • Call me by your name

    Call me by your name

    Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics   This article contains spoilers. One of the films most hotly tipped for Oscars success this year – and in my opinion most deserving of it – is Call Me By Your Name. The film has received rave reviews from...

  • We can use colour to communicate how we feel

    We can use colour to communicate how we feel

    Bokeh Art Photo/Shutterstock.com   When people are sad they are often said to be “blue”. Jealousy is implied if someone is described as being “green with envy”. Angry people “see red” while yellow is associated with happiness, and in contrast,...

  • Major Baden-Powell’s three-year stay in Malta

    Major Baden-Powell’s three-year stay in Malta

    Lord Baden-Powell is probably best known in our islands as the founder of the Boy Scout Movement; a movement that is still immensely popular in Malta and Gozo. While Baden-Powell visited Malta in later life, this article focuses on the three years...

  • Winter is here, and Orion comes with it

    Winter is here, and Orion comes with it

    It doesn’t take an experienced astronomer to realise that the night sky gradually changes throughout the year. Stars appear to rise four minutes earlier every day, a phenomenon resulting from the Earth’s rotation around the sun. Different parts of...

  • Myth debunked: Is there no gravity in outer space?

    Myth debunked: Is there no gravity in outer space?

    When we think of outer space, we sometimes assume that there is no gravity because we see astronauts floating around aboard spacecraft such as the International Space Station (ISS). While astronauts do, in fact, experience weightlessness in a...

  • Photo of the week

    Photo of the week

    The Orion Nebula, shot by Josef Borg through a 0.2m-telescope from Birkirkara.

  • Take a bow

    Take a bow

    The Astra Theatre is celebrating its jubilee today – 50 glorious years in Republic Street, Victoria. Sixty-one productions later, including double representations in most years since 1978, the institution celebrates its 50th anniversary with a...

  • A huge asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, but what danger do smaller ones pose?

    A huge asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, but what danger do smaller ones pose?

    A small asteroid passed relatively close to Earth this month, having been discovered just six days earlier. This might sound scary, but it’s unusual that such an object would actually collide with the Earth. Each year about 50,000 tonnes of...

  • Are men dying out?

    Are men dying out?

    The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch” gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or...

  • Da Vinci self-portrait in Malta exhibition

    Da Vinci self-portrait in Malta exhibition

    Medieval art historian Nicola Barbatelli will be bringing Leonardo da Vinci’s self-portrait to Malta as part of an exhibition to be held at the University’s Valletta campus. He tells Simonne Pace about his passion for the Renaissance world and...

  • Explainer: where do the names of our months come from?

    Explainer: where do the names of our months come from?

    Our lives run on Roman time. Birthdays, wedding anniversaries, and public holidays are regulated by Pope Gregory XIII’s Gregorian Calendar, which is itself a modification of Julius Caesar’s calendar introduced in 45 B.C. The names of our months...

  • The seaplanes are back

    The seaplanes are back

    The Rolex Middle Sea Race celebrates Malta’s maritime connections. Another, albeit lesser known, event has the same aim: the Como to Malta Seaplanes Rally – Roberts Cup. Its originator, Jonathan Galea, recalls the country’s rich aviation history...

  • Mysteries of the Main Guard inscription

    Quite recently, Arnold Cassola discovered in a foreign repository an important hoard of hitherto unknown Melitensia: watercolours, Victorian photographs, literature and engravings. These were put together by an inquisitive and wealthy foreign...

  • Will we rock down to Electric Avenue?

    Will we rock down to Electric Avenue?

    We live in a country of petrol heads. Nearly 400,000 petrol or diesel-powered cars choke our roads and lungs and guarantee long commutes, ever more asphalt and a shortened lifespan. If you happened to be a keen cyclist like me you’d know what it...

  • Scientists to make waves in Malta after groundbreaking discovery

    Scientists to make waves in Malta after groundbreaking discovery

    The year 2016 heralded the arrival of a new probe of nature – the first direct observation of gravitational waves that earned scientists the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for this groundbreaking discovery. Sure, we had seen hints before; in fact,...

  • Precision medicine for Maltese colorectal cancer patients

    Colorectal cancer, also known as bowel cancer, affects about 250 Maltese men and women each year. These cancerous growths of the bowel wall develop for several reasons, but who we are (i.e., our genetic make-up) and what we are exposed to...

  • Myth debunked: Burying your head in the sand

    Myth debunked: Burying your head in the sand

    The phrase “burying your head in the sand”, is used frequently – even in the columns of this newspaper.  It is used when someone ignores obvious facts, or advice, while hoping that, given time, the problem at hand will simply go away. This phrase...