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Health & Fitness

  • Checking your mobile phone at night could lead to depression

    Checking your mobile phone at night could lead to depression

    Disruption to the body clock increases the risk of mood disorders and depression, a large study has confirmed. Scientists at the University of Glasgow looked at the circadian rhythms - which control functions including sleep patterns, body...

  • Blood donor who saved millions gives his last pint

    Blood donor who saved millions gives his last pint

    James Harrison, nicknamed 'the man with the golden arm,' has made his last blood donation after donating blood 1,173 times and saving the lives of over 2.4 million babies over several decades.  The 81-year-old Australian James Harrison has a rare...

  • Why a bricklayer is more likely to die before a banker

    Why a bricklayer is more likely to die before a banker

    Men who have physically active occupations are 18 per cent more likely to die prematurely, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The results of this study may surprise many people, given that the health...

  • Junk food ads face ban on Tube and buses across London

    Junk food ads face ban on Tube and buses across London

    Junk food advertising could be banned on the London Underground network as part of plans to tackle the capital's "ticking time-bomb" of childhood obesity. The proposals, unveiled by London Mayor Sadiq Khan, would also extend to the capital's buses...

  • First reported deaths in Congo Ebola outbreak came in January

    First reported deaths in Congo Ebola outbreak came in January

    Cases of hemorrhagic fever were reported in an area of Congo that is facing an Ebola epidemic as far back as December and the first deaths were reported in January, a spokesman for the World Health Organization said in the capital Kinshasa on...

  • Australian scientist, 104, plans to kill himself with 'Swiss option'

    Australian scientist, 104, plans to kill himself with 'Swiss option'

    A 104-year-old Australian scientist travelled to Switzerland to end his life, telling a news conference on Wednesday the nation's liberal assisted suicide laws let him commit suicide legally, in contrast to his home where it remains...

  • Heart failure on the rise in Malta

    Heart failure on the rise in Malta

    Heart failure is on the rise in Malta, and awareness of the condition was still quite low, cardiologist Robert Xuereb said on Wednesday. Speaking to mark Heart Failure Awareness Day, Dr Xuereb said heart failure affects one to two per cent of the...

  • Cholera vaccination campaign starts in Yemen - WHO

    Cholera vaccination campaign starts in Yemen - WHO

    The first vaccine campaign against cholera in Yemen has started, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday, a year and a half after an epidemic was triggered by war and a health and sanitation crisis. There have since been more than one...

  • Thousands of British women face crippling foot problems

    Thousands of British women face crippling foot problems

    Foot experts have revealed for the first time why women's feet suffer in their summer shoes - they wear the wrong size. This comes as the annual "socks off season" the longed-for time every year when women can finally ditch their socks and boots...

  • Victims of Japan's forced sterilisations demand justice

    Victims of Japan's forced sterilisations demand justice

    One day when Saburo Kita was 14, he was taken from an institution for troubled children to see a doctor. Despite protesting that his health was fine, he was ordered to strip, lie down on a table, and was given a local anaesthetic. Then the surgery...

  • Babies' pupils might hold key to early autism diagnosis, study suggests

    Babies' pupils might hold key to early autism diagnosis, study suggests

    Babies whose pupils react more strongly to sudden changes in light intensity are more likely to later be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a study has shown. Researchers from Birkbeck, University of London, said their findings provide...

  • Increasing immunisation for the greater good

    Increasing immunisation for the greater good

    Routine immunisation is one of the best public health strategies available to control many infectious diseases. Indeed, immunisation is the first contact point of a child with health services, thus providing an important link to healthcare at the...

  • Hormone injection treatment could replace gastric band

    Hormone injection treatment could replace gastric band

    A hormone injection that imitates the gastric band could be the "most exciting" treatment for obesity. Trials being conducted by scientists at Imperial College London reportedly found that patients ate 30% less food after being given a monthly jab...

  • Women who eat fast food and little or no fruit 'take longer to become pregnant'

    Women who eat fast food and little or no fruit 'take longer to become pregnant'

    Women who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, a study has suggested. Compared with women who ate fruit three or more times a day in the month before conception, women who ate...

  • Doubling light activity cuts risk of premature death by almost 30%

    Doubling light activity cuts risk of premature death by almost 30%

    Pretty much everyone knows that taking exercise helps people stay in good health. It staves off chronic ailments like type 2 diabetes and heart disease and – maybe – helps us live longer. Until recently, however, the prevailing view among both...

  • Scientists devise new, more accurate peanut allergy test

    Scientists devise new, more accurate peanut allergy test

    British scientists have developed a far more accurate blood test to diagnose peanut allergy, offering a better way to monitor a significant food hazard. Peanuts are the most common cause of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis, or severe allergic...

  • Ecstasy therapy may help service veterans suffering PTSD

    Ecstasy therapy may help service veterans suffering PTSD

    Combining intensive psychotherapy with a pure form of the party drug ecstasy is safe and could aid recovery in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the findings of a study in military veterans. Scientists who conducted...

  • Vitamin D could be a 'game changer' for malnourished children

    Vitamin D could be a 'game changer' for malnourished children

    High-dose vitamin D supplements improve weight gain and help with the development of language and motor skills in severely malnourished children, our latest study has found. Severe acute malnutrition is the most extreme and visible form of...

  • 'Tip-of-the-tongue' less frequent for older people who are fit

    'Tip-of-the-tongue' less frequent for older people who are fit

    You meet with a friend and tell her about a great book you’re reading. “It’s by a really famous author. Her name is, um … ” But the author’s name doesn’t come to you. This is one of those frustrating tip-of-the-tongue moments that happen when you...

  • Four out of five young mothers feel lonely

    Four out of five young mothers feel lonely

    Four out of five young mothers feel lonely after having a baby and meet their friends less often, a new study shows. Research by the Co-op found that many mothers under the age of 30 feel too tired to go out, or simply want to stay with their...