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Health & Fitness

  • Curtain falls on Vienna AIDS ball after 26 years

    Curtain falls on Vienna AIDS ball after 26 years

    One of the world's biggest AIDS charity events, Vienna's Life Ball, will be held for the last time in June, the organiser said Friday. Gery Keszler said the progress achieved in fighting AIDS over the 26 years since the ball's inception meant it...

  • Anger linked to illness in old age

    Anger linked to illness in old age

    Not all negative emotions are necessarily bad. In fact, they can direct your behaviour in useful ways. If you’re stuck in traffic and running late, anger with the situation might motivate you to find an alternative route, which will then relieve...

  • Hospital ship plies turbulent waters of Colombia's Pacific coast

    Hospital ship plies turbulent waters of Colombia's Pacific coast

    As a white ship chugs through the muddy waters of the San Juan River, pirogues from the jungle glide toward it almost reverently, bringing their sick to healers they liken to angels. For hundreds of miles along Colombia's Pacific coast, with its...

  • Denver first US city to decriminalise 'magic mushrooms'

    Denver first US city to decriminalise 'magic mushrooms'

    Denver on Wednesday became the first US city to decriminalise psychedelic mushrooms, as voters approved a ballot initiative by a razor thin margin. The new ordinance loosens restrictions on the personal use and possession of psilocybin mushrooms,...

  • Corporations are funding health and nutrition research - should you be worried?

    Corporations are funding health and nutrition research - should you be worried?

    For the health-conscious consumer, it’s hard to keep up with the dizzying array of products on offer. Consumers want unbiased information to help them make the right choices, and industry says it is listening and working with health researchers to...

  • Worldwide, obesity rising faster in rural areas

    Worldwide, obesity rising faster in rural areas

    Obesity worldwide is increasing more quickly in rural areas than in cities, a study reported Wednesday, challenging a long-held assumption that the global epidemic of excess weight is mainly an urban problem. Data covering 200 countries and...

  • Empathy in healthcare is finally making a comeback

    Empathy in healthcare is finally making a comeback

    A doctor friend – let’s call her Anne – was teaching three smart medical students who were told to diagnose a woman complaining of nonspecific pain and anxiety. After 20 minutes of questions, the students wrote seven pages of notes and recommended...

  • Teenage pregnancy doesn't have to mean catastrophe

    Teenage pregnancy doesn't have to mean catastrophe

    The idea of having a baby as a teenager often is viewed as both a personal catastrophe and a social problem. This is probably why the continuing decline in teenage births in Britain – which is now at the lowest level since records began – is...

  • World's first vaccine suitable for both humans and livestock?

    World's first vaccine suitable for both humans and livestock?

    If ever there were proof that humans are animals too, it’s in the diseases that we share with other species. From rabies and Zika to Ebola and bird flu, many deadly diseases around the world can pass between animals and people. Currently, we have...

  • Screen time for children: WHO's approach may do little to curb obesity

    Screen time for children: WHO's approach may do little to curb obesity

    Get children more active. That’s the aim of the World Health Organisation’s new guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under five years of age. The guidelines make specific recommendations about the amount of...

  • Misplaced faith in Mother Nature is holding us back from scientific benefits

    Misplaced faith in Mother Nature is holding us back from scientific benefits

    Measles cases in the US have hit a 25-year high, with 78 new infections in the past week alone. In a sign of the times, a cruise ship with hundreds of Scientologists on board was quarantined in St Lucia after one passenger was diagnosed with the...

  • Scientists develop device to detect bacteria in minutes, not days

    Scientists develop device to detect bacteria in minutes, not days

    The era of doctors prescribing patients powerful antibiotics while they wait for lab reports could soon be numbered, with a new device returning results within minutes instead of days. It was invented by a team at Penn State university and...

  • Millions hungry as drought grips Somalia: charity

    Millions hungry as drought grips Somalia: charity

    Drought has left nearly two million Somalis in desperate need of food, a humanitarian agency warned Monday, as poor rainfall pushes communities to the brink across East Africa. The Norwegian Refugee Council said hundreds of thousands of children...

  • No sex please, I’m old

    No sex please, I’m old

    We talk to children about sex using the ‘birds and the bees’ story – where the birds produce eggs and the bees pollinate plants – as examples of sexual reproduction. We also need a lesson about sex in older age as the rules of the game...

  • Curacao readies for Scientolgy cruise ship carrying measles case

    Curacao readies for Scientolgy cruise ship carrying measles case

    The Dutch territory of Curacao said Saturday that to prevent any health risk it will check passengers before allowing them to disembark from a cruise ship owned by the Church of Scientology that was quarantined after a measles case. The Freewinds...

  • Breakthrough treatment prevents sexual HIV transmission among gay men: study

    Breakthrough treatment prevents sexual HIV transmission among gay men: study

    HIV-suppressing medication can make the AIDS virus "untransmittable" even among couples who have sex without using condoms, new research showed Friday. The Europe-wide study monitored nearly 1,000 gay male couples over a period of eight years,...

  • Extra nipples, bones and teeth: why?

    Extra nipples, bones and teeth: why?

    Scientists in the UK recently reported that a bone that was thought to be lost to evolution is making a comeback. The little bone, known as the fabella (little bean), is found at the back of the knee – if it is found at all. The scientists...

  • People love coffee and beer for the buzz, not the taste: study

    People love coffee and beer for the buzz, not the taste: study

    Fancy yourself a coffee connoisseur with a love for dark roasts? Or maybe hoppy pale ales are more your thing? The truth may be that our preferences for caffeine or alcoholic beverages  - or indeed sugary sodas -  derive not so much from the way...

  • Cialis gets your heart pumping - in more than one way

    Cialis gets your heart pumping - in more than one way

    In the 1990s, the US drug firm Pfizer was developing drugs to treat angina. During early trials of these drugs, male participants reported a striking side effect: they were getting erections. This discovery led to the development of drugs to treat...

  • Can you wake up after decades in a coma? The story behind the headlines

    Can you wake up after decades in a coma? The story behind the headlines

    In 1991, a car crash left Munira Abdulla, a 32-year-old woman from the United Arab Emirates, with devastating brain injuries. Doctors reportedly thought she might never regain full consciousness. However, in late 2018, almost three decades after...