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Health & Fitness

  • Could AI take control of human birth?

    Could AI take control of human birth?

    Instead of looking up at the sky to see whether you need an umbrella, people increasingly ask virtual assistants such as Alexa. And they may be wise to do so. AI methods are powerful – capable of anything from analysing astrophysical data to...

  • Two out of every five who take antibiotics do not need them

    Two out of every five who take antibiotics do not need them

    The Maltese still consume far too much antibiotics, which could cause resistance to them when they are needed later on. Sarah Carabott gets an update on the situation. At least two out of five people taking antibiotics in Malta don’t need to,...

  • ‘No one with Parkinson’s disease should live alone’

    ‘No one with Parkinson’s disease should live alone’

    This year the Malta Parkinson’s Disease Association marks 10 years since it began supporting people with Parkinson’s and their families. Association president Veronica Clark traces the long journey from its humble beginnings. Anne Downing founded...

  • More people are experiencing severe food allergies than ever before

    More people are experiencing severe food allergies than ever before

    The recent inquest into the death of Natasha Ednan-Laperouse from anaphylaxis after eating a Pret A Manger baguette she was unaware contained sesame, could lead to a change in labelling legislation. Indeed, a recent investigation found that...

  • Why snacking could be damaging your health

    Why snacking could be damaging your health

    Only until relatively recently in human evolution have we eaten three meals plus snacks every day. Breakfast simply didn’t exist for large parts of history. The Romans, for example, didn’t eat it – usually consuming only one meal around midday –...

  • Philippine taxes on sugary drinks could avert thousands of deaths, WHO study

    Philippine taxes on sugary drinks could avert thousands of deaths, WHO study

    The Philippines could avert 24,000 premature deaths linked to diseases such as diabetes, stroke and heart failure in the next two decades after it adopted taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on...

  • Migrants tend to be healthier, live longer - study

    Migrants tend to be healthier, live longer - study

    Migrants tend to be healthier than the residents of wealthy countries they travel to, such as the United States, and often help fight diseases by becoming healthcare workers in those nations, according to a study published on Wednesday. Populist...

  • New test could diagnose all cancerous DNA

    New test could diagnose all cancerous DNA

    Researchers have developed a test that could be used to diagnose all cancers. It is based on a unique DNA signature that appears to be common across cancer types. The test has yet to be conducted on humans, and clinical trials are needed before we...

  • World's first baby born via womb transplant from dead donor

    World's first baby born via womb transplant from dead donor

    A woman in Brazil who received a womb transplanted from a deceased donor has given birth to a baby girl in the first successful case of its kind, doctors reported. The case, published in The Lancet medical journal, involved connecting veins from...

  • Despite innovation, Europeans wait years for new cancer drugs

    Despite innovation, Europeans wait years for new cancer drugs

    Rapid advances in cancer science have increased the number of new oncology drugs being developed, but delays in regulation and approvals mean patients in Europe often wait years to be able to access them, researchers said on Tuesday. A report led...

  • What's your status? Ten facts to mark the 30th World AIDS Day

    What's your status? Ten facts to mark the 30th World AIDS Day

    The global campaign to end AIDS has made significant strides but the epidemic remains one of the world's leading public health challenges, affecting almost 37 million people. Campaigners say one of the biggest challenges in the fight to end AIDS...

  • Risky behaviour fuelled by mobile apps, social media

    Risky behaviour fuelled by mobile apps, social media

    World AIDS Day, introduced by the World Health Organisation in 1988, is observed annually on December 1 and raises awareness of the pandemic, which is caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It was recently preceded by European...

  • Salmonella warning withdrawn

    Salmonella warning withdrawn

    The health authorities have withdrawn a salmonella warning in eggs produced by two Maltese farms.  Last July, the authorities had urged the public to refrain from buying eggs produced by St Joseph Farm-M. Xerri and a farm in Triq Santa Domenika,...

  • World Aids Day: Overcoming the STIgma

    World Aids Day: Overcoming the STIgma

    The World Health Organisation today marks the 30th anniversary of World AIDS Day with the theme ‘Know Your Status’. Since 1988, World AIDS Day has been a platform to spread awareness and education about AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome)...

  • Ebola outbreak in east Congo now world's 2nd biggest

    Ebola outbreak in east Congo now world's 2nd biggest

    The current Ebola outbreak in eastern Congo is now the second biggest in history, with 426 confirmed and probable cases, the health ministry said late on Thursday. The epidemic in a volatile part of Democratic Republic of Congo is now only...

  • 'What we're eating is killing us' - global nutrition report

    'What we're eating is killing us' - global nutrition report

    Poor diets are among the top causes of ill health globally, accounting for nearly one in five deaths, according to a study published on Thursday that called on governments and businesses to do more to improve eating habits. Eating unhealthy food,...

  • Furhat, a robot with the human touch, wants to hear your woes

    Furhat, a robot with the human touch, wants to hear your woes

    Furhat tilts his or her head, smiles, exudes empathy and warmth, and encourages us to open up. The robot, a three-dimensional bust with a projection of a human-like face, aims to build on our new-found ease talking to voice assistants like Siri...

  • What happens to the brain in zero gravity?

    What happens to the brain in zero gravity?

    Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield on the International Space Station in 2012. NASA   NASA has made a commitment to send humans to Mars by the 2030s. This is an ambitious goal when you think that a typical round trip will anywhere...

  • Being born working class is bad for your health

    Being born working class is bad for your health

    Social mobility is seen as an essential societal goal – one that occupies most democratic governments. But moving up and down the social ladder can be very stressful, and it is well documented that long-lasting or repeated stress is bad for your...

  • ‘Government has role in shaping health habits’

    ‘Government has role in shaping health habits’

    In his latest book Health and Society – Personal and Social Determinant of Health, published by the Malta University Press in 2018, Maurice Cauchi embarks upon the important endeavour of communicating and analysing trends shaping health and...