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Think-ing about Malta’s humanity

The latest edition of Think, the University of Malta’s research magazine, takes a close look at Malta’s art, giving a critical insight into Malta’s politics, morality, ethics, beauty and creativity – all essential parts of being human.

From the historic to the contemporary, Maltese art has always been influenced by global forces. Frank Portelli and Esprit Barthet adopted the cubist aesthetic. Gabriel Caruana’s ceramic works transformed the Maltese art scene. But contextualising their work in an international setting is key to truly appreciating and understanding our heritage, argues Nikki Petroni.

Through the arts, this issue also challenges our human tendency to think in dichotomies. Prof. Vince Briffa discusses how he translates this phenomenon into confrontational installations. An interview with artist Aaron Bezzina reveals how his journey to creating compelling sculptures from scavenged material began.

But art is not confined only to traditional media. Comics and film, which not so long ago were frowned upon as an art form, are having new light shone upon them in the world of academia. Prof. Gloria Lauri-Lucente and Dr Fabrizio Foni discuss the art of the adaptation, showing us new perspectives.

Finally, Charlotte Stafrace talks about how she is trying to bridge the gap between young and old, learning lessons through art and storytelling. Active Age – Intergenerational Dialogue has highlighted the things we all have in common, regardless of age, gender, or race.

The 23rd edition of Think also deals with other research on diverse topics such as the impact of dance, the power of storytelling and community, self-driving cars, cybersecurity, and how Malta manages its waste, or doesn’t.

The magazine may be picked up for free at the Msida campus or at newsagents. It is also available online at the websites below and may be liked on www.facebook.com/ThinkUoM.

www.um.edu.mt/think

www.issuu.com/thinkuni

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