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Dealing with more horrible bosses

Sequel delivers over-the-top antics as trio are again plagued by superiors who make their lives miserable

From left: Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman and Charlie Day meet more horrible bosses, while still dealing with old ones, including Jennifer Aniston.

From left: Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman and Charlie Day meet more horrible bosses, while still dealing with old ones, including Jennifer Aniston.

Horrible Bosses 2 (2014)
Certified: 15
Duration: 108 minutes
Directed by: Sean Anders
Starring: Jason Bateman, Charlie Day, Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Jamie Foxx, Chris Pine, Christoph Waltz, Kevin Spacey, Jonathan Banks, Lindsay Sloane
KRS Release Ltd

2011’s Horrible Bosses was quite a hit with moviegoers piling in to help it bring in about €200 million in box office returns. The film had been likeable and the cast had been game enough to deliver performances that made the characters really likeable and sustain skeleton plot for the film’s duration.

The sequel will please fans of the first movie since it delivers more of the same that was given three years ago with director Sean Anders making sure to continue where Seth Gordon had left off. The main objective here is to deliver the laughs and the more outrageous they are the better.

Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis and Charlie Day all return to their roles as Nick, Kurt and Dale. They are three friends who in the first film had been plagued by horrible bosses and which led them to enter into criminal activities to get rid of them. Together they hope to launch their own product: a shower tool that they call ‘The Shower Buddy’, that they believe will be a massive bestseller. The problem is they need the capital to fund it.

The film’s selling point and ultimate bankability is the cast which click and time each other out in well-oiled synchronicity

By hook or by crook they get the attraction of Burt Hanson (Christoph Waltz) and Rex (Chris Pine), his son, who are mega-rich. Soon the three have the cash and the project is under way, albeit the wrong choices that the trio make.

However, Burt’s intentions are to seize their idea and business and leave them on the side.

The trio’s reply is to kidnap Burt’s son and so get the money they were looking for in the first place.

The film’s major asset is that the cast seem to be really enjoying themselves and this translates well on screen giving the story extra beat.

Whatever the silliness and over-the-top outrageous antics the cast are involved in, it is all made in good spirit and made in such a way as to make the story go over the top.

The low brow gags and humour are designed to be seen rather than told and the film brings a spirit of naughtiness to it that makes everything seem acceptable.

Jennifer Aniston, in a supporting role, is downright sexy and ultra naughty again, giving the movie some memorable lines while Charlie Day reproduces a moronic characterisation that makes him look lost yet inanely charming.

Jason Bateman and Jason Sudeikis both play characters who are likeable and the more they try to make things better the more the audience knows they will mess it up.

The supporting cast do not let the movie down as the award-laden cast here are not afraid to play it fast and furious and get the laughs in any way they could.

Kevin Spacey once again verbally bludgeons the three actors in a delicious manner; Jamie Foxx is once again the adviser from the hood who seems to be having a ball.

Christoph Waltz is deliciously evil even though he could have been given more scenes through which he could have chewed gleefully.

The film’s selling point and ultimate bankability is the cast which click and time each other out in well-oiled synchronicity.

The laughs are all there to be had and this will end up being the much needed light entertainment that will relieve you from the stress of Christmas.

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