Survey reveals weight-loss trends in Europe
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Survey reveals weight-loss trends in Europe

According to a pan-European weight-loss survey commissioned by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), manufacturers of the weight management aid alli and partners of the Pink-alli weight loss programme, Europeans spend an average of 3½ years trying to shed off extra weight.

The average weight loss target for obese and overweight persons hovers around 12kg and most people cite living longer and improving their self-confidence as reasons for wanting to lose weight. Only 14% of overweight or obese Europeans claim to have never tried losing weight.

European men mainly believe eating the wrong foods is the main reason behind their weight problem, while women said they eat too much of it. Men and women also seem to have different ways of dealing with weight-loss, with men opting to create their own weight-loss plan and women choosing to consume more low-fat foods.

Two thirds of those who have tried or are trying to lose weight find it a struggle to maintain their reduced weight and women are more likely than men to say they could not keep the weight off over time.

Such failed attempts may lead to disappointment and demotivation. A quarter of those interviewed feel that people are prone to pass judgements based on their appearance. Women tend to express more negative emotions than men, and overall, men have a higher success rate. A third of those interviewed have not yet spoken to a healthcare professional about their weight.

Monica Abdilla, GlaxoSmithKline Country Manager, said: "These surveys help us understand the internal conflicts obese and overweight persons have to battle with when attempting to lose weight. The alli programme is designed to offer individuals the chance to make a positive lifestyle change while encouraging others who are struggling with similar issues to engage with professionals who can help them achieve a realistic and sustainable weight-loss goal for a healthier lifestyle."

The following candidates are currently following a weight loss programme offered by alli and Pink magazine. The candidates are receiving free alli treatment complemented with individual one-on-one advice on how to tackle weight issues with the professional help of a nutritionist, personal trainer, psychologist and pharmacist.

Since enrolling in the Pink-alli programme, Agnes Falzon (51, housewife and catering student) has been making use of alli and keeping a food diary to help her monitor her food and calorie intake. "This exercise helps me review my diet and understand how I can improve on it. The professional help I am receiving also helped me formulate a realistic weight loss goal which I can now work towards achieving."

Antoine Grima (48, self employed) has so far managed to lose 3.5kg. "The Pink-alli programme is helping me considerably. I altered my eating habits and this has reduced the occasional cravings I used to get. I am also beginning to look forward to my regular exercise sessions at the Chic Physique Gym whose professional team are always ready to give me useful advice for a healthier and more active lifestyle."

Duncan Sant (32, bank manager) believes the advice received from the professionals involved in the Pink-alli programme is the key to his success. "Whenever I go out to eat with friends, I always make sure I eat moderate portions. My daily exercise programme has become part of my daily routine, and I always make sure I have time for it, even when I finish late from work."

alli (www.alli.com.mt) is a weight loss aid which helps adults lose 50% more weight than by dieting alone. For adults with a BMI of 28 or more, alli works by blocking about 25% of fat in the food eaten from being absorbed into the body. It is the first and only EU-licensed, clinically proven weight loss aid available without prescription.

alli is a medicinal and contains orlistat. Always read the product leaflet and consult your doctor, or pharmacist for advice.

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