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Opinion

  • Do we speak Maltese?

    Do we speak Maltese?

    The problem of whether English words should be spelt the English or the Maltese way when writing in Maltese has resurfaced. Most of the contributions have dwelt on aesthetic or patriotic aspects. The age-old battle between conservation and...

  • The Lord Denning of Malta

    His chequered life, his love for acting but, above all, his brilliant legal mind, place Maurice Caruana Curran in a prominent place in Malta’s legal Parthenon. His sense of public duty, his creative legal mind and his love for our country’s...

  • Do we look like monkeys?

    Do we look like monkeys?

    No disrespect meant to monkeys, after all we all know about evolution and all that, but quite honestly do Mario Camilleri and the Prime Minister think we are brain dead or something? As a young boy I recall reading the Famous Five and...

  • Dark corners of Malta

    Dark corners of Malta

    There are still some dark, hidden areas of Maltese society. Despite our increasing affluence and conspicuous consumption, if you venture away from the prosperity of Sliema, St Julian’s, Mdina, Lija and Balzan, you will find lurking in the...

  • Not just another CEO

    Amid the carnage that is emerging from territories controlled by IS, the heroic figures of bishops who remain with their people against all odds are beacons of hope and love. These bishops, among whom is our own Sylvester Magro, have vowed to...

  • Run rabbit run, rerun

    Run rabbit run, rerun

    We’ve long known that Prime Minister Joseph Muscat likes to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds. That’s why he is where he is today, because he sold the Labour Party’s soul to all and sundry, offering everything to everyone in return for...

  • Execute terrorist plotters

    Execute terrorist plotters

    European police forces are becoming more and more adept at catching terrorist cells. Secret services are becoming more sensitive, more experienced, and they are employing ever more sophisticated methods by which to discover them and forestall...

  • Pigeons carrying a message

    I have been persuaded to write this contribution by the recent, somewhat uncustomary, public declaration of loyalties by several prominent members of the public with regard to the upcoming referendum. I shall be voting Yes and pledge my support to...

  • Citizen needs protection

    The best executive is one “who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they are doing it”. Wise words from US President Theodore Roosevelt. The Auditor General...

  • Foreign policy in turmoil

    The turmoil in Libya is a reflection of internal politics devoid of dialogue. But it also confirms the West’s lack of assistance to construct stable institutions of governance following the ousting of the Gaddafi regime. The Libyan situation is...

  • Search for derogation

    I wish to shoot down two misconceptions that I personally had and which, I presume, other voters may have. Firstly that Malta had negotiated a derogation of the Birds Directive during negotiations of our Accession Treaty and, secondly, that such a...

  • An institution in disarray

    The leading article ‘Hindering the quest for the truth’ (March 7) would have us believe that the government’s stand on whether the Ombudsman has jurisdiction to investigate complaints by Armed Forces of Malta officers is an attempt to diminish the...

  • Another UK hung Parliament?

    Another UK hung Parliament?

    Britain votes in a general election on May 7 and the polls indicate that the most likely outcome will be another hung Parliament. I would personally not like to see either the Conservatives or Labour win an overall majority of seats, as I don’t...

  • A migrant by any other name

    Last Friday, The Guardian carried a short piece about the language of migration. The drift was that African, Arab, and Indian people who live outside their countries of origin are called ‘migrants’, while Europeans who do the same are called...

  • The future must surely come

    I was forced into the thick of it, way back in 1994, when as a newly appointed member of the Authority of Review, I was asked to join a Review Panel to decide on a number of contestations on the then newly published regulations protecting birds...

  • A lift for the Bibliotheca

    Ask me no questions and I’ll tell you no lies, an Irish playwright once wrote. As details of the Café Premier bailout emerged in the National Audit Office report, the government’s rationale grew increasingly hard to defend. The businessmen...

  • The GWU’s kowtowing act

    The General Workers’ Union has been making the headlines for all the wrong reasons. If the clock is turned back two years, I’m sure people will remember that the GWU was making itself a chief protagonist within the ‘alliance’ put together by the...

  • No honour among thieves

    On Wednesday morning we woke up to news reports of yet another corruption scandal. At this rate local corruption scandals are being revealed more often than Kim Kardashian posts selfies online. This latest revelation involved a Gozo bigwig – the...

  • Cynic Malta and bankrupt political morality

    It has not been a good month for politicians. The revelations of the Maltese connections with Swiss Leaks; two reports by the Auditor General damning the government for the deal with Café Premier and the hedging with Socar; and the allegations...

  • Men and pregnancy in job interviews

    Men and pregnancy in job interviews

    On Monday, the day after Women’s Day, a good friend of mine had a job interview. She was quizzed about her abilities and she thought she did rather well. Then, at the very end came an unexpected volley of questions. “Do you have children?” “Are...

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