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Opinion

  • A question of credibility

    The opinion piece penned by the Opposition spokesman on public finances is a classic case of convoluted logic and erroneous statistics. This member of an administration that registered the highest fiscal deficit in Malta’s history argues that the...

  • Quality tourism

    Quality tourism

    It is a truism that Malta’s tourism industry is one of the mainstays of the economy. The last few years have seen tourism’s contribution growing year by year. Edward Zammit Lewis has been an energetic, competent and effective Minister for Tourism,...

  • To quota or not to quota

    And so it has finally happened.  Thanks to President Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca the urgency of action to ensure parliamentary gender parity has been pushed on to the national agenda.   Kudos to the President. Never one to shy away from a...

  • Correctional officers and GWU

    The General Workers’ Union affirms that the Correctional Officers’ Union (COU) did not submit a notice of termination of affiliation from the union. The GWU came to know of the situation within the COU from media reports. Furthermore, one needs to...

  • Politics as public service

    As we get near to the next general election, it is worthwhile to examine the state of Maltese politics today. Unfortunately, it is not a pretty picture. Cynicism is the order of the day, and many are disillusioned with the depths to which politics...

  • Partitocracy, misrule of law

    Partitocracy, misrule of law

    Cicero once affirmed: “Legum omnes servi sumus ut liberi esse possimus” (we are all the servants of the law so that we may be able to be free). Freedom is possible when the law is respected and it is endangered when the law is frequently breached.

  • Brexit and its lessons

    Former deputy prime minister Michael Heseltine went viral last week with his remarks that the UK will be suffering the greatest loss of sovereignty in its history with its withdrawal from the European Union. Heseltine touches on the reason which...

  • Jihadists in St Petersburg

    On April 3, the terrorist explosion in St Petersburg’s underground train station claimed 13 lives. Russia’s anti-terrorist authorities soon found that this indiscriminate massacre was a suicide attack, executed by a 22-year-old Russian (of Kyrgyz...

  • The uncomfortable truth

    Prime Minister Joseph Muscat is heralding the balanced cash-budget of 2016 as one of the hallmarks of his administration. At face value, the fact that the government’s finances are in the black is positive. But if there is one important lesson we...

  • Big data, big issues

    Big data is a new term in the world of policymaking. It is at once all over the place yet invisible. Indeed, many people have probably never heard of it. A cursory search for the meaning of big data reveals that this refers to data that is too big...

  • Selective silence, morals

    “My silence cannot be bought!” is the current battle cry used by the leader of the Opposition. As days go by it is becoming evidently clear that what Simon Busuttil really means is that his silence cannot be bought because it doesn’t need to, he...

  • Farmers’ market in Ta’ Qali

    I write on behalf of the farmers who sell their produce at the farmers’ market in Ta’ Qali and this with reference to the two articles that were published in this newspaper entitled: ‘13% of fruit and veg had excessive pesticides’ (February 8) and...

  • It’s blooming spring!

    It’s blooming spring!

    Do you know The Burning House game? When you have to say what three things you’d snatch on your way out if your house is on fire? It always makes me anxious even thinking about it. What would I grab? From the vantage point of the sofa, in a...

  • An open door to an empty tomb

    The first image that comes to mind on Easter Sunday is that of an open door to an empty tomb. We are in a garden, very close to a small hill which was used as the execution venue for slaves and Jews. On that hill, a carpenter from Nazareth, a man...

  • The end of ‘America first’?

    The end of ‘America first’?

    The US airstrikes on a Syrian air force base – the first such attack by America against the regime of Bashar al-Assad – represent an extraordinary turnaround from the earlier rhetoric used by Donald Trump about how he would conduct his country’s...

  • The missing public park

    The sign at Tigné Point says: “Stick to the footpath”. It’s a bit difficult to disobey those instructions. If you had to try to wander off the path towards the seaward side you’d merely be clambering over the rosemary bushes on the growing medium...

  • Coalition of convenience

    The news that the president of the Malta Developers Association, Sandro Chetcuti, was asked by both party leaders to contest the general election did not come as a surprise. When Malta Today journalist Raphael Vassallo quipped that Chetcuti...

  • Operation Marsa swamp

    Orwell couldn’t have made it up. Last Wednesday, some bright spark de­cided that Marsa was a major threat to law and order. Squads of police swooped down on the place and rounded up all those who looked like migrants and who were waiting for work...

  • The right to insult

    Originally, Labour intended to reform press and libel laws to help lift the burden of hefty legal fees, libel damages and fines from a financially beleaguered press. This noble cause was openly embraced by the government until somewhere down the...

  • Corruption: just a perception?

    Recently, Transparency International published a league table of perceived corruption among the nations of the world. Malta’s ranking was 47th, the worst position we have occupied since we joined the EU in 2004, when we were in 24th place. In the...

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