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Opinion

  • Who’ll care for our elderly?

    Who’ll care for our elderly?

    Living at Dar tal-Kleru (Clergy Home) after 40 years in Milan has made me deeply conscious of my advanced age. Fifty priests, some bedridden, are being taken care of by the ‘Cenacle Sisters’, at the home which was founded in 1964 by the late...

  • Literacy strategy: is it working?

    Minister of Education Evarist Bartolo’s boas-ting about the initiatives taking place in schools and with families to enhance reading need to be accompanied by an equal resolve to assess their success. The PIRLS 2011 results underlined the...

  • A sense of proportion

    A sense of proportion

    Eight weeks ago, the stunning news broke about the involvement of Minister Konrad Mizzi and the Prime Minister’s chief of staff, Keith Schembri, in a highly suspicious and ill-judged plan to set up a trust in New Zealand, with a shell company in...

  • A man of contrasts

    A man of contrasts

    When Pope John Paul II died on April 2, 2005, the cardinals from all over the world converged on Rome to select the new pope. The attention of the world was concentrated on four main names (the so-called papabili) in the following order: Joseph...

  • Leaders who embrace values

    If one had to see this country from afar, one would see a progressive government boasting 6.3 per cent economic growth, an Opposition on a crusade to throw stones and a public that has no role model for its future. Are we lost or is there still...

  • A booming economy

    A booming economy

    Reading through the Country Report Malta 2016 issued by the European Commission, the verdict reads stark clear: the economy is booming. Economic performance is robust and exhibiting substantial resilience to challenges on a macroeconomic...

  • Losing my religion

    Losing my religion was a single released by an American alternative rock group R.E.M. This song does not speak about religion. Rather, it refers to a popular colloquial American expression. It underlines a high level of exasperation, irritation...

  • Limited political discourse

    One thing that I really hate in Maltese politics is the way political discourse is still, to a large extent, monopolised by the two major political parties. While it is true that the advent of social media has helped towards democratising...

  • Trusts, shady offshore centres

    What I write is based on hands-on experience working in a senior executive post with a British international bank in Nassau, Bahamas back in the 1970s. I have since then gained further knowledge on trusts and on setting up companies in offshore...

  • The Panama paradox

    There is so much to say about the global Panama Papers controversy. It is the talk of town everywhere you go around Malta. Really and truly, it seems to be part of the perfect storm of bad governance overshadowing the Labour government. In a way...

  • Frittering away votes

    Frittering away votes

    He won by a landslide historic victory in 2013 securing a majority of no less than 36,000 votes. The colossal majority shook the country to the core either in disbelief or in worship. Analysts predicted he would be firmly rooted for 10 or 15 years.

  • Ideology slanting the truth

    There is a pervasive trend to adopt an ideological lens with which to view and report stories in western media outlets. A quick Google search of ‘feminist lens’ will get you dozens of academic papers and insights from a ‘critical feminist...

  • Is The Jungle Book too scary for children?

    Is The Jungle Book too scary for children?

    I dislike ‘family restaurants’. By which I mean those vast, open planish restaurants with folding menus longer than my arm, where everyone just spoons food in their mouths as they stare at huge television screens and where the din is worthy of a...

  • Playing one’s cards well

    I met a well-meaning someone the other day who told me that things were moving very quickly on the Panama matter, and that I should refrain from trying to guess what might happen next. She had in mind my last column, in which I predicted that...

  • Evidence that justice reform is working

    The latest EU Justice Scoreboard brings good news to Malta about the justice sector. It confirms that the work being done by this government is reaping results and that our justice system is becoming more efficient and better. The turnaround is...

  • Lions, placards at Castille

    Last Sunday at the national protest against corruption, I stood with my back to St James Ditch. In front of me was the newly-cleaned façade of the Auberge de Castille, under a bright blue sky. To the left were the lovely, old walls of St James...

  • Notes on a scandal or two

    The great thing about history is that you can always count on it repeating itself.  So if you missed it the first time, you’ll catch the re-run. Our local Panama story has set me thinking. It has dominated the news for a number of weeks now, and...

  • Pressure cooker politics

    Every time I sit in front of a computer these days, it’s as if the keys start typing away the words ‘Panama Papers’ automatically. Most permutations of the scandal have been covered and people have reached their own conclusions. If the Prime...

  • Is unity all the country needs?

    Deadlines help you organise your time and set your priorities, writer Harvey Mackay used to say. It even forces you to exclude or include topics. My Thursday night deadline explains why I have not commented on Pope Francis’s apostolic exhortation...

  • Money no object? Panama calls…

    (Dring dring, dring dring) “Buonos dias; Peppi’s Bank, Panama City ’ere… ’ow can I ’elp you?” “Er, yes, um… Good afternoon. I’d, er… I’d like to speak to the manager please.” “Certainly señor, right away, and ’oo shall I say is calling?”“Um, yes,...

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