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Health & Fitness

  • Running ‘cuts junk food cravings’

    Running can help cut cravings for unhealthy foods such as pizzas, burgers and doughnuts, a study has found. Nutritionists at the University of Aberdeen used brain imaging to discover a new link between exercise and appetite. Participants in the...

  • Oily fish ‘can increase brain size’

    Eating more oily fish can increase brain size in later life and may help prevent age-related mental decline, a study has found. People with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil preserve bigger brains as they age, the research shows.

  • Caffeine could help boost memory

    A double espresso shot after swotting for an exam might help to jog those elusive memories, new research suggests. Scientists have found the first clear evidence of caffeine’s memory-boosting effect, and shown that it lasts at least 24...

  • New childhood cancer trial launched

    Scientists have launched a new trial with the hope of treating a rare but deadly childhood cancer. Neuroblastoma develops from nerve cells. The cancer usually starts in the child’s abdomen and can spread to other areas such as the bones, liver and...

  • Childless couples have happier marriages

    Couples without children have happier marriages, according to one of the biggest studies ever of relationships in the UK. Childless men and women are more satisfied with their relationships and more likely to feel valued by their partner, the...

  • Oestrogen study makes dementia link

    High oestrogen levels and diabetes can dramatically increase the risk of dementia in older women, a study has found. Having both raised the risk 14 times compared with the rate for women without diabetes. On their own, high oestrogen levels also...

  • Breakthrough for peanut allergies

    Children can be protected from the dangerous effects of peanut allergy by slowly building up their tolerance, research has shown. After six months of the therapy, up to 90 per cent of allergic children taking part in a study could safely eat five...

  • Yoga helps breast cancer patients

    Yoga can alleviate the side effects of treatment for breast cancer, a study has found. Practising yoga for as little as three months reduced symptoms of fatigue and inflammation that followed radiotherapy in a group of patients. On average,...

  • Soap ‘best aid to fighting colds’

    Zinc supplements and soap may be the best answer to the common cold, say experts. New research suggests that when it comes to avoiding sniffles, simple solutions are not to be sneezed at. A review of 67 randomly controlled trials (RCTs) indicated...

  • Sleeping well could cut cancer risk

    Sleeping well may help to protect men from deadly prostate cancer, a study has found. Scientists linked higher levels of the night-time hormone melatonin with a 75 per cent reduced risk of advanced disease. Melatonin is produced in the dark at night.

  • Maternal nutrition critical

    Obesity in pregnancy can alter the brain wiring of babies and leave them prone to long-term disorders such as diabetes and uncontrolled weight gain, a study suggests. Scientists made the discovery after investigating why children whose mothers are...

  • Quarrelling parents harm children

    Quarrelling parents who fail to resolve their arguments are leaving their children at risk of long-term mental health problems, new research has found. Exposing children to constant feuding can also cause physical problems in youngsters such as...

  • How ‘good’ cholesterol turns bad

    Scientists have shown how “good” cholesterol can go bad and contribute to heart disease and strokes. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good” cholesterol, normally protects against heart and artery disease by helping to keep blood vessels...

  • Stethoscope may soon be obsolete

    A doctor’s most important fashion accessory, the stethoscope, may be heading for the scrap heap after 200 years, it is claimed. The development of new, more accurate and compact ultrasound devices could soon consign the Victorian stethoscope to...

  • Walking and texting? Watch out!

    Texting on the move affects the way people walk and may expose them to danger, according to new research. Writing texts while walking can alter posture and balance, say scientists who studied the effects of mobile phone use on 26 healthy...

  • Air pollution linked to heartattacks

    Long-term exposure to air pollution increases the risk of heart attacks – even at levels below current European limits, experts have warned. Research on more than 100,000 people followed up for almost 12 years found that exposure to particulate...

  • Move more, sit less

    Sitting around too much increases the risk of heart failure in men even when they exercise regularly, a study has found. Physical activity alone is not enough to stave off heart failure, said experts. A reduced level of sedentary behaviour, such...

  • Medicinal properties of indigenous plants

    Inflammation is the body’s response to infections and other cell-damaging events. Oxidative stress occurs when the body’s cells are unable to defend themselves property to certain damaging molecules called oxidants. Oxidative stress causes further...

  • Happy feet, happy lifestyle

    Our feet are not something we think about too often unless they give us problems; when they do, our lifestyle suffers. We also don’t usually associate the effects of ageing with problems relating to our feet; we are more likely to worry about how...

  • The percentage of fitness

    I would like to thank all of you who take the time to write in. I receive interesting comments and queries, some of which I enjoy replying to privately; others lend themselves nicely to being discussed publicly. I get the feeling many of those...

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