Advert

Health & Fitness

  • Hong Kong issues ‘red alert’ against South Korea travel

    Hong Kong issues ‘red alert’ against South Korea travel

    Hong Kong issued a ‘red alert’ advisory yesterday against non-essential travel to South Korea, where eight new cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (Mers) were reported bringing the total to 95 with seven fatalities. The number of new South...

  • Modern housing could cut risk of malaria by up to half – study

    Modernising mud huts and other traditional housing could significantly cut the risk of malaria for people living in some of the highest risk areas of Africa, Asia and South America, according to new research. Scientists who studied the impact of...

  • Electronic tool to aid cancer care developed in the UK

    Electronic tool to aid cancer care developed in the UK

    An innovative electronic tool to help deliver more personalised care to people with cancer has been developed by the Macmillan Cancer Support, one of the largest charities in the UK. The electronic Holistic Needs Assessment (eHNA) provides...

  • Music linked to blood pressure

    Music linked to blood pressure

    Music could be used as a treatment for heart conditions after being scientists found a link with a change in blood pressure. Listening to a repeated 10-second rhythm found in various music compositions – particularly by Italian composer Giuseppe...

  • Cancer spread 'trigger' discovered

    Cancer spread 'trigger' discovered

    New therapies to stop the deadly progression of breast cancer in its tracks could stem from a fresh study into the disease, researchers believe. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh said they have discovered a “trigger” that allows breast...

  • Study gives 'beach bum' new meaning

    Study gives 'beach bum' new meaning

    Scientists in the UK are launching a study into how surfers are affected when exposed to human sewage in the water – by taking swabs from their bottoms. A team from the University of Exeter is joining forces with environmental campaign group...

  • Bone health starts in the womb

    Bone health starts in the womb

    Today saw the launch of the 2015 World Osteoporosis Day (WOD) campaign organised by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF). Celebrated on October 20, this year’s theme focuses on nutrition and addresses the public health challenges...

  • Wire test ‘can assess heart damage’

    A simple test could predict what happens after a heart attack, researchers said today. Studies have shown that a wire inserted into a coronary artery, which supplies blood to the heart, can predict if a patient will go on to develop heart...

  • Fat ‘fights coronary heart disease’

    Fat ‘fights coronary heart disease’

    The fat surrounding blood vessels can help fight heart disease, according to new research. The studies may help explain why the paradox exists that people with a Body Mass Index (BMI) that signifies obesity are actually more likely to live longer...

  • Help with lethargy

    Last week I looked at how tiredness and losing motivation to carry out even the smallest of tasks can affect our lives. Hypo-thyroidism is well known for causing exhaustion. However, last week I looked at the findings of Barry Durrant-Peatfield,...

  • The first repetition

    The first repetition

    The more I meet and chat with experienced personal trainers, the more I notice various common skills they share, arising from a multitude of years of experience in assisting clients reach their personal and fitness goals. A skill set that so often...

  • ‘A new lease on life’

    A man whose cancer left him with severe damage to the top of the head has received what his doctors in Houston describe as the first skull and scalp transplant, the MD Anderson Cancer Center said. James Boysen, a 55-year-old software developer...

  • Tattoos ‘behind blood donor drop’

    Tattoos ‘behind blood donor drop’

    A huge increase in people getting tattoos has been blamed for a massive decline in new blood donors in the UK. Foreign travel to exotic places and people living busier lives are also thought to be reasons why there are 40 per cent fewer new people...

  • Ears op boy fulfils sunglasses wish

    Ears op boy fulfils sunglasses wish

    A boy born without any ears has fulfilled his simple wish to be able to wear a pair of sunglasses for the first time after having a new pair of ears created from his own ribs. Nine-year-old Kieran Sorkin was born deaf and also had a rare condition...

  • ‘World still unpreparedfor future pandemics’

    ‘World still unpreparedfor future pandemics’

    While man’s ability to treat disease is better than ever before, the Ebola epidemic serves as a reminder that as international travel gets easier, the risk of similar outbreaks increases The global health system is unable to handle another mass...

  • West Africa is on alert for meningitis

    An epidemic of meningitis has killed 545 people in Niger, out of 8,234 people who caught the disease, but has now peaked, the World Health Organisation said. The WHO had said that the epidemic was worrying and unprecedented because it was a strain...

  • Contact lens wearers have unique eye microbes

    Contact lens wearers have unique eye microbes

    People who wear contact lenses have different microorganisms living on the surface of their eyeballs than those who do not, according to new research. That may explain why contact wearers tend to have more eye infections, the researchers reported...

  • Drugs getting stronger - EU agency report

    Drugs getting stronger - EU agency report

    The annual report of the EU’s official drugs monitoring agency, European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), warned that a “marked rise” in the purity and potency of some of the most commonly used illicit drugs ˗ cannabis,...

  • Sedentary behaviour at work continues to cause concern

    Sedentary behaviour at work continues to cause concern

    Research conducted among employees in the UK revealed 70 per cent of office workers want their employer to support them in taking regular breaks at work for the sake of their health.    Younger members of Britain’s workforce aged 18-34 are most in...

  • Screening cuts cancer deaths by 40%

    Screening cuts cancer deaths by 40%

    Breast cancer screening between the ages of 50 and 69 leads to a 40 per cent reduction in women dying of the disease, according to a major international review. Overall, women invited to attend mammography screening have a 23 per cent reduction in...

Advert
Advert