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Health & Fitness

  • Soy-rich diet protects women from osteoporosis after menopause

    A soy-rich oriental diet can protect women from bone weakening and osteoporosis after the menopause, a study has found. Women become more susceptible to the brittle bone disease after “the change” as levels of protective oestrogen fall. Since...

  • FreeBacon hashtag sizzles on social media

    FreeBacon hashtag sizzles on social media

    Bacon lovers took to social media last week to express disdain over a World Health Organisation report that said processed meat is likely to cause cancer. The hashtags #FreeBacon, #Bacongeddon and #JeSuisBacon were among the top-trending topics...

  • ‘Don’t be scared of sausages’ – Germany

    ‘Don’t be scared of sausages’ – Germany

    Sausages, like sunshine, are beneficial in moderation, Germany’s agriculture minister said last week, after a World Health Organisation (WHO) report warned that eating processed meats can cause cancer. The report, which classified processed meat...

  • California considers adding meat to cancer-alert update

    California considers adding meat to cancer-alert update

    California is examining new World Health Organisation findings to determine whether to add red meat and foods like hot dogs, sausages and bacon to a cancer-alert update, setting the stage for a potential battle with the meat industry over warning...

  • Subway to switch to antibiotic-free poultry

    Subway to switch to antibiotic-free poultry

    Subway announced that next year its over 27,000 restaurants in the US will start switching to poultry products that are only made from chickens and turkeys raised without antibiotics. The company plans to make all poultry dishes antibiotic-free...

  • Climate deal more important for your health than you realise – WHO

    A new global agreement to combat climate change, due to be reached in December in Paris, is more important for everyone’s health than many people realise, a senior World Health Organisation official said. Apart from the direct impact, disasters...

  • Sugar and the heart

    Sugar and the heart

    The consumption of sugar is very much in the news at the moment. Consumers tend to be led by the most newsworthy subjects, so everyone will be focusing on sugar. This could be to the exemption of other harmful additives to our diet. It is all...

  • Show us your muscles

    Show us your muscles

    One might argue that history tends to progress in a cyclical nature. Every so often we find ourselves facing the same challenges our forefathers faced whether in war, peace or revolution in militant or cultural form. On a decidedly less grand...

  • Low-carb much better than low-fat diets for weight loss

    Low-carb much better than low-fat diets for weight loss

    Adopting a low-fat diet and fore-going guilty pleasures such as crisps and fry-ups may not be the best way to slim, a study has found. Experts who analysed data on more than 68,000 adults concluded that curbing fat intake did not lead to greater...

  • Surprise labour

    Surprise labour

    A woman who went into labour on board a flight gave birth to a baby girl four minutes after arriving at hospital. Zoe Ireland Drake weighed just 850 grams when she was born at 25 weeks last Saturday. Speaking for the first time, her mother Jenny...

  • You probably have herpes

    You probably have herpes

    Two-thirds of the world’s popul-ation under 50 have the highly-infectious herpes virus that causes cold sores around the mouth, the World Health Organisation said on Wednesday, in its first estimate of global prevalence of the disease. More than...

  • Tuberculosis now rivals Aids as leading cause of death

    Tuberculosis now rivals Aids as leading cause of death

    For the first time, tuberculosis infections rivalled HIV/Aids as a leading cause of death from infectious diseases, the World Health Organisation said in a report released on Wednesday. It found that 1.1 million people died of TB in 2014. During...

  • Eating healthily when young protects against heart disease

    Eating healthily when young protects against heart disease

    A 20-year-long study has confirmed that eating healthy when young protects against heart disease decades later. Young adults who ate the most fruit and vegetables were 26 per cent less likely to have hard deposits building up on their artery walls...

  • Reducing sugar ‘improves health’

    Reducing sugar ‘improves health’

    Reducing sugar in diets even without cutting calories or losing weight has the power to drama-tically improve health, experts have said. A new study involving obese children found impressive results in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol in as...

  • Keeping Alzheimer's patients out of nursing homes

    A cheap off-patent drug that relieves some symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease may also help keep people at an advanced stage of the illness out of nursing homes, at least for a while. Research showed that withdrawing the commonly-used drug donepezil...

  • Hands off that bacon sandwich

    Hands off that bacon sandwich

    Global health experts are to warn that bacon, ham and sausages are as big a cancer threat as cigarettes, it has been reported. The World Health Organisation (WHO) is publishing a report today on the dangers of eating processed meats. It is...

  • Doctors and nurses don’t always have healthy habits

    Doctors and nurses don’t always have healthy habits

    Even doctors and nurses don’t always follow the healthy lifestyle choices they recommend for patients to reduce the risk of medical problems like obesity, heart disease and diabetes, a US study suggests. Although rates of these conditions appeared...

  • Health specials

    Health specials

    After the saga of dementia and brain health over the past few weeks, here are a range of health specials, at least one of which will be of interest to you or someone you know. I have often mentioned good mood food. Well a new study has, once...

  • Introducing children to fitness training

    Introducing children to fitness training

    Throughout the weeks it is with great pleasure that I accept the honour of being able to discuss any aspect of health, exercise and fitness with you and get tapping away on my trusty keyboard to that effect. In terms of audience, we generally tend...

  • More than 11 moles on your arm?

    More than 11 moles on your arm?

    People who have more than 11 moles on their right arm could have a higher risk of skin cancer, research suggests. Experts say they have found a new way for GPs to quickly assess whether somebody may be at risk of developing melanoma. Counting...

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