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Health & Fitness

  • ‘Baby’ blues

    ‘Baby’ blues

    Depression is more common in first-time mothers when the child is four years old than at any time during the 12 months after giving birth, according to a new study. Research carried out in Australia has shown almost one in three first-time mothers...

  • High cholesterol may hit fertility

    High cholesterol levels may reduce a couple’s chances of having children, a study has found. The US research suggests a link between raised cholesterol and infertility as well as heart disease. When both partners in a couple had high amounts of...

  • Loss of smell clue to Alzheimer’s?

    Loss of smell clue to Alzheimer’s?

    Work is under way to see if loss of the sense of smell is an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease. The study is being carried out at University College London’s (UCL) Dementia Research Centre, with support from charity Alzheimer’s Research UK and The...

  • Lower smear test age ‘may do harm’

    Lower smear test age ‘may do harm’

    Campaigns which aim to lower the age for smear tests “do more harm than good”, according to an article in a leading medical journal. Glasgow GP Margaret McCartney said there is “confusion” about smear tests both among the public and the medical...

  • Oily salad ‘helps blood pressure’

    Oily salad ‘helps blood pressure’

    Tossing a salad in olive oil dressing may be one way to keep blood pressure under control, a study suggests. The combination of unsaturated fat and nitrate-rich lettuce and celery suppresses an enzyme in the body linked to high blood pressure, or...

  • Olive oil supplements aid arteries

    Olive oil supplements may protect arteries from the effects of air pollution, research has shown. Taking three-gram supplements every day for a month helped to keep the blood vessels of volunteers functioning healthily after they inhaled air...

  • E-cigarettes boost quitting success among smokers

    E-cigarettes boost quitting success among smokers

    Smokers trying to quit are 60 per cent more likely to report success if they switch to e-cigarettes than if they use nicotine products like patches or gum, or just willpower, scientists said yesterday. Presenting findings from a study of almost...

  • E-cigarettes boost quitting success among smokers, study finds

    E-cigarettes boost quitting success among smokers, study finds

    Smokers trying to quit are 60 percent more likely to report success if they switch to e-cigarettes than if they use nicotine products like patches or gum, or just willpower, scientists said. Presenting findings from a study of almost 6,000 smokers...

  • Drug ‘slows lung disease progress’

    Drug ‘slows lung disease progress’

    A major international study has found that a drug previously used as a cancer treatment can significantly slow the progression of a fatal lung disease. Nintedanib has been found by the research team led by Southampton General Hospital to halve the...

  • Special food for Crohn’s patients

    Crohn’s disease patients could be given special meals to help them recover in hospital. Last year it emerged that almost four-fifths of sufferers in the UK were forced to rely on family and friends to bring food to hospital for them. And 46 per...

  • Could gluten be making you ill?

    Could gluten be making you ill?

    Gluten-free is the latest cliché in the world of trendy diets. The popularity of this diet can be largely attributed to bestsellers like Wheat Belly by Dr William Davis and Grain Brain by Dr David Perlmutter. Unfortunately, these books and much of...

  • Nutrition and eye disease

    Nutrition and eye disease

    Last week, we looked at eye disease and its connection to age. We also looked at age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract and diabetic retinopathy, all of which were explained. Today, we are going to look more closely at nutritional advice...

  • Be cool, calm and collected

    Be cool, calm and collected

    “Try harder! Relax!” Wouldn’t it be strange hearing such a contradictory statement being shouted by an angry coach to an under-performing team of footballers at half-time? Well, according to some experts and some cultures, such a statement is not,...

  • Curing tennis elbow

    Curing tennis elbow

    Lateral epicondylitis, or tennis elbow, as it is most commonly known, is the term used to describe inflammation and pain on the outer elbow, where tendons are attached to bone. It is often caused by repetitive movements, usually performed while...

  • Conference on integrating spirituality in health care

    The relationship between religion, spirituality, health and illness, as a way to address patients’ needs holistically, will be discussed at the 4th European Conference on Religion/Spirituality and Health being held from Thursday to Saturday at the...

  • Overweight donors are ‘equally good’

    Overweight donors are ‘equally good’

    Overweight people are “equally good” stem cell donors as those of a healthy weight, a charity has found. New research by the British Bone Marrow Registry and blood cancer charity Anthony Nolan found that clinically obese people can successfully...

  • Life expectancy rises again

    Life expectancy rises again

    Average life expectancy has risen globally to 73 years for a girl born in 2012 and 68 for a boy following successes in fighting diseases and child mortality, the World Health Organisation said. Big advances in the battles against infectious...

  • Bugs in lungs may help with asthma

    Bugs invading the lungs shortly after birth may help prevent asthma in later life, research suggests. The discovery, made in mice, supports the idea that over-clean conditions early in life can set the stage for asthma and other allergy...

  • Antidepressant in Alzheimer’s link

    Antidepressant in Alzheimer’s link

    A widely-used antidepressant can reduce levels of a brain-clogging protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease, research has shown. Scientists say it is too early to recommend the drug to Alzheimer’s patients, but the build-up of “plaque” deposits in...

  • Immunity link to childhood asthma

    Immunity link to childhood asthma

    A vulnerability to viral infections may explain why babies treated with antibiotics are at an increased risk of developing asthma, research has shown. Scientists found that infants given the drugs before their first birthday were more than twice...

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