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Health & Fitness

  • Medical marijuana: good evidence for some diseases, weak for others

    Medical marijuana: good evidence for some diseases, weak for others

    Moderate- or high-quality evidence supports the use of marijuana for some medical conditions, but not for others, according to a fresh review of past research. After reviewing 80 randomised trials that included nearly 6,500 people, researchers...

  • Climate change turning into ‘medical emergency’

    Climate change turning into ‘medical emergency’

    The threat to human health from climate change is so great that it could undermine the last 50 years of gains in development and global health, experts warned yesterday. Extreme weather events such as floods and heatwaves bring rising risks of...

  • Fungal furore for beer drinkers

    Fungal furore for beer drinkers

    Big beer drinkers who down as much as two pints a day may be exposing themselves to harmful levels of fungal toxins, a study has found. Researchers analysed the amounts of mycotoxins produced by microscopic fungi in 154 brands of beer sold in...

  • WHO finds herbicide to be ‘possibly carcinogenic’

    A widely used farm chemical that is a key ingredient in a new herbicide developed by Dow AgroSciences “possibly” causes cancer in humans, a World Health Organisation research unit has determined. The classification of the weed killer,...

  • Nerves warning over skinny jeans

    Nerves warning over skinny jeans

    Squatting in skinny jeans for a long period of time has been linked to damage of the muscles and nerve fibres in the legs, health experts have warned. Doctors have described the case of a 35-year-old woman who collapsed and spent several hours...

  • Vitamin D deficiency claim questioned

    Vitamin D deficiency claim questioned

    A belief that a lack of sunshine caused increased heart disease and deaths through a deficiency in vitamin D has been challenged by Scottish scientists. Research from the University of Dundee, led by emeritus professor Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe,...

  • Red wine's' anti-obesity secret

    Red wine's' anti-obesity secret

    An ingredient in grapes, berries and red wine can turn excess flab into calorie-burning "brown" fat, research has shown. The discovery suggests that diets containing the substance, resveratrol, may help combat obesity. Scientists gave mice amounts...

  • Cancer – starving the cells

    Cancer – starving the cells

    Cancer cells feed off glucose. Therefore, fasting or dramatically reducing calorie intake might be able to reverse the disease. This is the suggestion of what appears to be a new therapy. However, the team who have brought this to the forefront of...

  • Weighty matters: new approach in the effective use of your bathroom scales

    Do you have a debilitating phobia? Are you dreadfully afraid of something specific? For some it might be heights, and others spiders. Some other things we get to fear a lot more often are pain, rejection or failure. Originally an essential...

  • Sophie La Girafe teether is completely safe

    Following certain comments on the social media about world-renowned teether Sophie La Girafe, local importers Paloma Cosmetics Ltd issued a statement to ease the mind of parents regarding the toy’s international-standard safety features. Sophie La...

  • Putting off parenthood might be good for your children

    Putting off parenthood might be good for your children

    Older mothers may have babies who grow up healthier and better educated than infants born to women in their twenties, an international study found. While the risk of having a premature baby was stronger for both teen mothers and women 35 and...

  • Eating up to 100g of chocolate daily linked to lowered heart disease and stroke risk

    Eating up to 100g of chocolate daily linked to lowered heart disease and stroke risk

    There may be no need to cut out chocolate to protect cardiovascular health, say researchers. Eating up to 100g of chocolate every day is linked to lowered heart disease and stroke risk, finds research published online in the journal Heart. There...

  • ‘Single dose’ malaria drug hope

    Scientists have discovered an antimalarial compound that could treat malaria patients in a single dose and help prevent the spread of the disease from infected people. The compound DDD107498 also has the potential to treat patients with malaria...

  • Trans fats 'linked to memory loss'

    A type of fat found in processed food has been linked to memory loss in working-age men. Trans-fatty acids, or trans fats, used to improve taste, texture and shelf-life, are known to be associated with an increased risk of heart disease and there...

  • Method to double IVF success rate discovered

    Method to double IVF success rate discovered

    Scientists believe they have found a way of doubling the IVF success rate by using a new method of embryo selection. The chance of success is highly dependent on the women’s age, with the latest NHS figures showing that 32.3 per cent of IVF...

  • Warning over ‘unhealthy’ cinema popcorn in the UK

    Warning over ‘unhealthy’ cinema popcorn in the UK

    Popcorn is not the healthy snack that many people believe it to be and some popular brands contain very high levels of salt and sugar, researchers have said. Consensus Action on Salt & Health (Cash) found some cinema popcorn in the UK contains...

  • Implants, signing let deaf kids be bilingual

    Implants, signing let deaf kids be bilingual

    Parents of deaf children face a critical responsibility to learn and use sign language, according to a majority of hearing experts quoted in the journal Paediatrics, although the question of whether or not to sign has grown increasingly...

  • Online breast milk ‘disease risk’

    Online breast milk ‘disease risk’

    Human breast milk sold online to adult buyers “poses many risks” including diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B and C and syphilis, experts have warned. Often bought by mothers who are unable to breastfeed, breast milk sold online can be cheaper than...

  • 15 years after smokers quit, heart failure risk may return to normal

    15 years after smokers quit, heart failure risk may return to normal

    For most former smokers who quit at least 15 years ago, the risks of heart failure and death are the same as those of someone who never smoked, according to a US study. “These results support the majority of literature, including that of the US...

  • Doubts on long-term knee op benefit

    The long-term benefits of knee surgery for middle aged or older patients are outweighed by the negative consequences, a study has found. Although rare, patients can suffer from infections, deep vein thrombosis, cardiovascular problems, pulmonary...

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