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Health & Fitness

  • Telling the lithium story

    Telling the lithium story

    For decades, lithium was the ‘go-to’ treatment for bipolar disorder. To this day, it still clinically outperforms widely prescribed, expensive pharmaceuticals which are better known (JAMA Psychiatry, 2016). Many physicians – including Jeffrey...

  • What is it really like to be fit?

    A very long time ago, in a place where most educated people held dear the ideal of a healthy mind in a healthy body, ancient philosophers would enjoy busying themselves with deep and thought-provoking discussions of essence. Roots in the ground, a...

  • ‘Veil of secrecy’ over mental health issues in the cockpit

    ‘Veil of secrecy’ over mental health issues in the cockpit

    Thousands of airline passengers are being flown by depressed and suicidal pilots, a study suggests. Findings from an anonymous global survey of 1,848 pilots showed more than 12.6 per cent met the criteria for clinical depression. Of this group,...

  • Study ties pubic hair grooming to sexually transmitted infections

    Study ties pubic hair grooming to sexually transmitted infections

    Before scheduling a bikini wax, or shaving down there, consider the results of a new study. Men and women who trimmed or removed their pubic hair were nearly twice as likely to report having had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) compared with...

  • Woman gives birth using ovary frozen when she was eight

    Woman gives birth using ovary frozen when she was eight

    A woman who had her fertility restored using frozen ovarian tissue which was removed when she was a child has given birth. Moaza Al Matrooshi, 24, is thought to be the first person in the world to be delivered of a baby after having the ovary...

  • Nurofen maker fined €4m for misleading Australian consumers

    Nurofen maker fined €4m for misleading Australian consumers

    The British manufacturer of Nurofen has been fined more than €4 million for misleading Australian consumers on the painkiller's ability to target specific regions.Reckitt Benckiser, based in Slough, marketed Nurofen "targeted" to treat four...

  • Fight against malaria hampered by flatlining funds - WHO

    Fight against malaria hampered by flatlining funds - WHO

    Funding shortfalls and fragile health systems are undermining progress against malaria and could jeopardise efforts to reach globally agreed targets on the way to eventual elimination, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said. Publishing its...

  • Athletes at higher risk of catching flu

    Athletes at higher  risk of catching flu

    Athletes who cram in extra workouts over the holidays to avoid packing on extra weight also need to take extra precautions to avoid getting sick, new guidelines stress. In some ways, athletes are just like the rest of us. They are more susceptible...

  • ‘Athlete’s heart’ looks different in males, females

    Cardiac changes associated with dynamic exercise are different in male and female athletes, research shows. In a study of elite athletes, Sanjay Sharma of St George’s University of London in the UK found that concentric remodelling or hypertrophy...

  • Treatment for mental disorders

    Treatment for mental disorders

    The rate of prescriptions for drugs to treat mental disorders is doubling every decade. Psychiatric drugs are being handed out in ever-increasing numbers to treat the supposed epidemic of depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, stress...

  • Exercising the brain: grey muscle?

    So you thought gym buffs were all brawn and no brains? Well, think again, and if you actually train like they do, you might just be able to think again, and again, and again. Science tells us that muscle-heads might be cleverer than you previously...

  • E-cigarette report sparks controversy

    E-cigarette report sparks controversy

    The U.S. surgeon general in a report released called for action to reduce the use of e-cigarettes among young people, noting they have overtaken cigarettes to become the most commonly used tobacco products among this group. Vivek Murthy, the...

  • Averting ‘holiday heart’

    Averting ‘holiday heart’

    It’s called ‘holiday heart’ because it happens to binge drinkers who feel a flutter or irregular heartbeat after too many cocktails at parties. But a research review suggests it can happen after just one drink. Conventional wisdom, based on plenty...

  • Junk food adverts targeting children to be banned in UK

    Junk food adverts targeting children to be banned in UK

    Junk food advertising is to be banned across all children's media - including online and social - in a landmark decision to help tackle childhood obesity. The new rules will ban the advertising of food or drink high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS)...

  • A guide to losing weight after your office parties

    A guide to losing weight after your office parties

    It’s that time of year again – the countdown to Christmas has begun, meaning plans for your annual office party will undoubtedly be set in motion. Whether you’ll be dining at a fine restaurant or going out for drinks, Christmas parties allow...

  • Doctors see regular misuse of antibiotics, narcotics

    Doctors see regular misuse of antibiotics, narcotics

    Antibiotics and narcotics are often prescribed when they aren't the best option for patients and may do more harm than good, a survey of US physicians suggests. The survey asked doctors to identify treatments that they see routinely used despite...

  • Being nuts about nuts

    Being nuts about nuts

    A handful of nuts a day can help to keep the doctor – and the undertaker – away, research has shown. People consuming at least 20g of nuts daily were less likely to develop potentially fatal conditions such as heart disease and cancer, the study...

  • Yo-yo dieting‘triggers caveman response which can mean weight gain’

    Yo-yo dieting‘triggers  caveman response which can mean weight gain’

    Yo-yo dieting triggers a caveman response to famine that leads to inevitable weight gain, research suggests. A survival mechanism hard-wired by evolution causes the brain to interpret repeated diets as periods of food scarcity. Between diets, it...

  • Squash claimed to be best exercise to keep death at bay

    Squash claimed to be best exercise to keep death at bay

    Regularly playing squash could help stave off death the longest, a study suggests. Scientists have narrowed down the sports and types of exercise that are linked to significantly lower odds of dying before those who do not do those...

  • Kicking habit of smoking in 60s can still increase life expectancy

    Kicking habit of smoking in 60s can still increase life expectancy

    Smokers can extend their lives by quitting even if they wait until their 60s to kick the habit, research has shown. A new study confirms that it is never too late to stop smoking –  and the earlier you give up, the longer you are likely to...

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