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Health & Fitness

  • ‘One-way bridge’ to smoking?

    ‘One-way bridge’ to smoking?

    Vaping is a “one-way bridge” to cigarette smoking among teenagers, a US study suggests. A team of researchers wanted to examine whether vaping was a predictor of future cigarette smoking among 17 and 18-year-olds. The study, published in the...

  • GPs urged to look for signs of depression in women who have given birth

    GPs urged to look for signs of depression in women who have given birth

    GPs should ask women who have given birth about their eating and sleeping habits in case they are suffering from depression, new guidance issued in the UK. Women go to their family doctor around six weeks after giving birth for a check-up to see...

  • Training can help surgeons tell patients best and worse scenarios

    Training can help surgeons tell patients best and worse scenarios

    Surgeons who get extra training to sharpen their communication skills may have an easier time explaining best and worst case scenarios to frail elderly patients as part of shared decision making, a small study suggests. For the study, researchers...

  • Ireland to open 'fix room' for heroin users

    Ireland to open 'fix room' for heroin users

    Ireland is to open its first pilot project "fix room" for heroin-users to inject under medical supervision. The location of the unit in Dublin city centre has yet to be decided but the Government decision signals a radical shift in drug policy and...

  • To encourage breastfeeding, pay in cash

    To encourage breastfeeding, pay in cash

    Cash incentives may encourage new mothers to breastfeed until their infants are at least six months old, a small experiment suggests. Pediatricians recommend that mothers exclusively breastfeed infants until at least six months of age because it...

  • Kids with asthma may have higher obesity risk

    Kids with asthma may have higher obesity risk

    Young children with asthma may be more likely to become obese by adolescence than their peers who don't have asthma, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data on 2,171 non-obese children in kindergarten and first grade and found they were 51...

  • Impromptu ice bath helpful for exercise-induced heat stroke

    Impromptu ice bath helpful for exercise-induced heat stroke

    A tarp, volunteers and a lot of ice water can be used to rescue athletes and other people from heat stroke caused by exertion if a traditional ice bath is not available, according to a new study. Researchers call the approach the "TACO method"...

  • Don’t skip breakfast!

    Don’t skip breakfast!

    Planning meals and snacks in advance and eating breakfast every day may help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, new guidelines from US doctors say. Eating more calories earlier in the day and consuming less food at night may also reduce the...

  • Fat shaming tied to increased risk of metabolic problems

    Obese people who feel stigmatised about their size may be at increased risk for metabolic syndrome, a new study suggests. Weight stigma is a chronic stressor that may increase cardiometabolic risk. Some individuals with obesity self-stigmatise,...

  • Headers in football can cause concussions

    Headers  in football  can cause concussions

    Headers have been confirmed as a cause of concussion among footballers, contrary to earlier findings. A US study found that football players who headed the ball a lot were three times more likely to suffer concussion symptoms than those who did...

  • Do you need a knee replacement?

    Do you need a knee replacement?

    I have been a runner for most of my life and, as would be expected, I am now experiencing a knee problem. It appears from an X-ray that there is no bone issue, so it must be soft tissue. The knee is a very complex part of our body and each...

  • Fight fat in five: fact or fiction?

    It’s been a while since I thumbed through a fitness publication by a newsagent magazine rack. Not that it really matters in fact, because the headlines don’t seem to have changed all that much over the years. It seems there really is no sense in...

  • Kids with asthma may have higher obesity risk - study

    Kids with asthma may have higher obesity risk - study

    Young children with asthma may be more likely to become obese by adolescence than their peers who don't have asthma, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data on 2,171 non-obese children in kindergarten and first grade and found they were 51...

  • WHO wants global focus on catching cancer early

    WHO wants global focus on catching cancer early

    Late diagnosis of cancer leads to millions of people enduring needless suffering and premature death, and efforts to catch the disease earlier must be stepped up, the World Health Organization said. In a report launched ahead of World Cancer Day,...

  • 'Heading' in football may lead to concussion symptoms

    'Heading' in football may lead to concussion symptoms

    Purposely "heading" a football ball may lead to concussion symptoms despite research suggesting those issues mainly arise from accidental knocks to the head, according to a new study. While amateur football players were at an increased risk of...

  • Genetic profile can guide treatment for some kids with leukemia

    Genetic profile can guide treatment for some kids with leukemia

    Certain children with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) and GATA1 mutations may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplants (SCT), according to a new study. "Historically, long-term survival for pediatric AMKL patients without Down syndrome...

  • Sleep tied to sexual activity and satisfaction among older women

    Sleep tied to sexual activity and satisfaction among older women

    Older women who sleep well at night are more likely to have satisfying sex lives, a study suggests. Post-menopausal women reported less sexual activity and less sexual satisfaction if they also had trouble sleeping through the night, researchers...

  • Piercing the wall of silence

    Piercing the wall of silence

    Four “locked-in” patients unable to speak, move or blink have reported they are “happy” after a successful attempt was made to read their thoughts. The extraordinary discovery was made during a groundbreaking experiment aimed at piercing the wall...

  • Brain games linked to delayed cognitive decline in the elderly

    Older people who engage in mentally stimulating activities later in life may have a lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment than their peers who don’t challenge their minds, a study suggests. For adults 70 and older without cognitive...

  • Conjunctival tumours in children nearly always benign

    Conjunctival tumours in children nearly always benign

    Conjunctival tumours in children are nearly always benign, but several features differentiate melanoma from nevus and lymphoma from benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH), researchers say. In a report in JAMA Ophthalmology, Dr Carol L.

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