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Health & Fitness

  • Overweight diabetes patients ‘live longer than slimmer ones’

    Overweight diabetes patients ‘live longer than slimmer ones’

    Patients with type 2 diabetes who are overweight but not obese outlive diabetics of normal weight, scientists reported, in another example of the ‘obesity paradox’. Although public health officials issue dire warnings about the consequences of...

  • Washington is world’s most dangerous rich city for babies – charity

    Washington is world’s most dangerous rich city for babies – charity

    Washington has the highest infant mortality rate of all the world’s richest capitals, according to a survey highlighting the failure of the world’s wealthiest country to prevent high rates of child deaths among its poorest citizens. Save the...

  • Early birth ‘hampers brain wiring’

    Early birth ‘hampers brain wiring’

    Premature birth can alter the wiring in key parts of a baby’s brain, a study has found. The discovery could help explain why being born too early increases the risk of neurodevelopmental problems – including autism and attention deficit disorders,...

  • Researchers reveal ‘secrets’ to longer life

    Researchers reveal ‘secrets’ to longer life

    If you want to live to 100, stop smoking, keep your cholesterol down, and drink no more than four cups of coffee a day. Those are the three top tips from scientists who analysed data on 855 Swedish men born in 1913, including 10 who celebrated...

  • Trade sitting for walking

    Trade sitting for walking

    Trading just two minutes of sitting for walking can help you live longer, scientists claim. Getting motivated for that much time of every hour otherwise spent languishing on a sofa or remaining stuck behind a desk reduced the risk of dying by a...

  • Work tasks ‘impact brain health’

    Work tasks ‘impact brain health’

    Professional jobs that challenge the brain may provide the best protection against mental decline in old age, research suggests. Memory and thinking ability is better preserved by solving problems, developing strategy, conflict resolution and...

  • New for men: broga yoga

    New for men: broga yoga

    Men who crave the benefits of yoga, but recoil at sharing the experience with a room full of women are turning to Broga, a rugged take on the 3,000-year-old practice of movement and breath. Broga celebrates the physical over the spiritual, and...

  • Sweatworking mixes business with exercise

    Sweatworking, the growing practice of meeting clients for a walk, a run or a fitness class, is elbowing networking out of bars and restaurants and into boutique fitness studios. A yoga, barre or spin class has become the new nine holes of golf,...

  • Food: a few tips to suit all people

    Food: a few tips to suit all people

    The most common advice given to people is to eat a healthy diet. This is such a subjective statement. What a healthy diet means to me may not be the same to you. Also, what constitutes a healthy diet for one person may not be the same for another.

  • Developments for a better industry

    Developments for a better industry

    In such an image-conscious world, it would seem we are all searching for innovative new ways to defy the ageing process, to look and feel our best. While the working out has always been an option, more people are choosing to adopt a more active...

  • Sugary drinks linked to diabetes risk

    Sugary drinks linked to diabetes risk

    Swapping a daily sugary drink for water or unsweetened tea or coffee can lower the risk of diabetes by up to 25 per cent, research has suggested. A study by the University of Cambridge also found that for every five per cent increase of a person’s...

  • Breastfeeding reduces chance of cancer return

    Breastfeeding reduces chance of cancer return

    Women with breast cancer who breastfed their babies are significantly less at risk of the disease recurring or killing them, a study has found. Overall a history of breastfeeding reduced the chances of cancer returning after treatment by 30 per...

  • Race to beat mosquito resistance

    Race to beat mosquito resistance

    Mosquitoes are rapidly developing resistance to insecticides used in bednets that millions of people rely on to protect them from malaria, experts say. Scientists are racing to develop new insecticides, warning that tens of thousands of people in...

  • DNA feedback ‘no one size fits all’

    A vast majority of people around the world would like to be told if their genetic data indicates serious preventable or treatable disease, research has shown. Findings from a global survey of 7,000 people revealed that 98 per cent would like to be...

  • Children living with only one parent ill more often

    Children living with only one parent ill more often

    Children who live with just one parent after family break-up suffer from more problems such as headaches, stomach aches, feelings of tension and sadness than those whose parents share custody, research has found. A study carried out in Sweden...

  • Parental link to child diabetes

    Children born to fathers with diabetes are around five times more at risk of developing type 1 diabetes as those without it, research has found. Those with mothers with type 1 diabetes have three times the risk, while the offspring of mothers with...

  • 5bn people ‘lack access to surgery’

    5bn people ‘lack access to surgery’

    A large majority of people in the world do not have access to safe and affordable surgery, according to a new report. An estimated five billion people, from a total population of seven billion, are unable to get surgical help when they need it,...

  • Swollen neck glands ‘cancer fear’

    Patients who have persistently swollen neck glands should be referred for specialist investigation as the symptom could indicate cancer, according to research. A team of scientists, led by the University of Exeter Medical School, say that such...

  • Back pain linked to ape ancestors

    Back pain linked to ape ancestors

    People with closer links to their ape ancestors may be more prone to a common cause of back pain, a study has shown. Evidence suggests that individuals with chimpanzee-like vertebrae are at greater risk of suffering a slipped disc. Bad backs may...

  • Cigar risks ‘equal to cigarettes’

    Cigar risks ‘equal to cigarettes’

    The health risks of smoking cigars are just as severe as from using cigarettes, researchers have said. The study was carried out in the US where the consumption of cigars doubled from 6.2 billion in 2000 to more than 13.7 billion in 2011 − in...

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