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Health & Fitness

  • Vigorous exercise cuts flu risk

    Taking part in vigorous exercise – such as running, fast cycling or rugby – cuts the risk of catching flu by around 10 per cent, research suggests. Doing at least two-and-a-half hours a week of activity that leads to sweating or hard breathing...

  • Viruses in the digestive tract

    There is a condition called Candida Albicans, which is an overgrowth of yeast in the gut that causes misery to those who suffer from it. I have written about it in the past, as well as experienced it. However, many people are not aware that there...

  • New Omega 3 supplement made from herring caviar

    Omega 3 MOPL Herring Caviar by Tom Oliver Nutrition is a premium marine bio-active fish oil food supplement sourced from herring caviar that was recently launched on the local market. It claims to offer a unique nutritional profile of...

  • Resurrecting ancient Greek ideals

    Healthy body, healthy mind. It is the ancient Greeks who are commonly accredited with the origins of this ideal. The phrase instantly conjures images of clean, white marble statues featuring chiselled musculatures and pondering gazes, at least to...

  • ‘Love hormone’hope for anorexics

    Oxytocin, a brain chemical known as the ‘love hormone’, is showing promise as a potential treatment for people with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, according to research by British and Korean scientists. In studies of anorexic patients,...

  • Test for breast cancer outcomes improved

    Scientists have developed an improved test to predict how long women with breast cancer may live and which treatments may work. Some doctors in the UK use a formula called the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) to give them an idea of a patient’s...

  • Exercise advised for lymphoedema

    Women who suffer painful swelling in an arm following breast cancer treatment should be encouraged to exercise, experts have said. Lymphoedema is a long-term condition that causes swelling in the body’s tissue, leading to pain and loss of mobility.

  • Ovarian cancer ‘linked to weight’

    Overweight women are more likely to get ovarian cancer than their thinner counterparts, researchers have said. Scientists have previously linked being overweight or obese to a number of other cancers such as those of the womb, breast and...

  • Blood test offers hope on dementia

    Scientists have developed a new blood test that could detect whether or not a person will develop dementia within three years. Changes in the blood may signify Alzheimer’s disease in its earliest stages, researchers found. A new study, published...

  • Study ties troubled sleep to lower brain volume

    People who have trouble sleeping tend to have less volume in certain regions of the brain than those without sleep problems, a new study of Persian Gulf War veterans suggests. “People discount the importance of sleep. So many things seem so much...

  • Bacteria ‘use language to thrive’

    Insights into how bacteria “talk” to each other could help scientists halt their growing resistance to antibiotics. A new study has revealed that bacteria use a form of communication similar to human language, but employing chemical signals...

  • Study examines lung disease drugs

    New treatments for some lung diseases are a step closer thanks to research that pinpoints why existing drugs are “ineffective”, according to scientists. The discovery could lead to better therapies for ailments such as chronic bronchitis and...

  • ‘Bad fat’ find aids obesity fight

    Scientists who have traced the origins of so-called “bad” fat in the body say the discovery could help to understand and treat obesity. A team from the Medical Research Council’s (MRC) human genetics unit at Edinburgh University discovered that...

  • Would you believe it?

    Having survived a heart attack, it is important to avoid a second attack and the more possible fatal consequences. Research has found that heart attack patients halve their risk of a second attack if doctors talk to them, play them music and help...

  • Headaches may start from your teeth

    For many years I have been surprising new patients by not initially examining their teeth but by questioning them about their general health. I then examine oral facial muscles and the Temporal Mandibular Joint (TMJ), for which I use a stethoscope...

  • Sport talk

    With our physical inactivity and obesity rates soaring, it’s easy to accuse the Maltese of lacking a sporting culture. Our children spend less time engaged in sports and physical activity and more time, apparently, eating unhealthy food. We fare...

  • Music 'not universal language'

    It is often said that music is a universal language but new research has found that not everyone gets the same pleasure from listening to it. Scientists have tuned into a condition called specific musical anhedonia, or the specific inability to...

  • ‘Heart to Heart’ Flora pro.activ seminars

    By 2030 more than 23 million people will die annually from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or heart disease? Main risk factors include raised blood pressure, raised blood cholesterol, overweight/obesity and diabetes. On the occasion of World Health...

  • Female contraceptive protects against HIV

    Scientists have developed a new contraceptive for women that protects against HIV. The device, which lasts for up to three months, delivers contraceptive medication and drugs that protect against HIV and herpes. Developed by biomedical engineer...

  • Nine-month-old baby may have been cured of HIV

    A nine-month-old baby who was born in California with the HIV virus that leads to Aids may have been cured as a result of treatments that doctors began just four hours after her birth, medical researchers said. That child is the second case,...

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