Advert

Health & Fitness

  • Don’t see red – laugh!

    Considering our busy lifestyles, taking five-minute breaks throughout the day is not only needed, it’s recommended. Nestlé Malta Ltd has found a creative way to help consumers relieve some of their daily stress through a multi-faceted campaign...

  • The healing power of yoga

    Lyonne Carabott’s first encounter with yoga turned out to be a life-changing experience. She tells Stephanie Fsadni how her immersion into this ancient practice made her realise its various health benefits, including stress and anxiety...

  • Take charge of your life

    Managing stress is all about taking charge of yourself. A healthy lifestyle builds your physical and mental energy and reverses your stress response, enabling you to avoid or even reverse the negative effects of stress. The team behind Stellina...

  • Probiotics don’t aid colic babies

    Probiotics do nothing to help soothe babies with colic, according to the largest research trial to date. Previous studies have suggested some benefit from giving infants probiotic drops, but they were flawed in their design, experts said. In the...

  • Young male smokers may raise obesity risk in their future sons

    Men who start smoking before the age of 11 risk having sons who are overweight, British researchers have found, adding to evidence that lifestyle factors even in childhood can affect the health of future offspring. The scientists said the...

  • Monitor could predict heart attacks in future

    Heart attacks could in future be predicted days in advance using a wearable blood monitor, research suggests. Scientists have identified two biomarkers whose levels drop dramatically within two weeks of a heart attack. The discovery could lead to...

  • Ancient drug reduces heart inflammation

    A drug that was used in the time of the pharaohs for rheumatism has proven highly effective in treating recurrent bouts of pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart, according to findings. The ancient medicine, colchicine,...

  • Have a nice flight

    Flying to a long-haul destination is your quickest route to enjoy the bounty of the US, solve the mysteries of Africa, fall in love with the Orient, and get rich with the (metaphorical) gold of Latin America. There’s just one problem – it’s not...

  • Blood pressure highs and lows

    Our blood pressure normally rises and falls throughout the day. It is at its highest in the morning and can vary from one arm to the other. The systolic reading (the first of two numbers, assessed when the heart is pumping) can rise by as much as...

  • Heart to Heart seminar talks about cholesterol, obesity

    Cholesterol and obesity were discussed during a Heart to Heart seminar, one of a series, organised by Unilever-owned Flora pro.activ. The seminars, organised once every few years, aim to address risk factors in the development of cardiovascular...

  • Obesity: is it linked to inactivity?

    There has been some debate exploring the possible reasons for the obesity epidemic sweeping the western world. Since on this tiny sunny patch of the planet we are forerunners in international obesity rankings, we should be concerned. Whether it’s...

  • Point-of-care clinic within patients’ reach

    The Health Ministry is improving the service of the Anticoagulant Clinic as part of overall improvements in the primary healthcare sector. The aim is to introduce a point-of-care Anticoagulant Clinic in the primary healthcare setting to improve...

  • Artificial life closer to reality

    A landmark step towards the creation of artificial life has been taken by scientists who have built a functioning synthetic yeast chromosome. Their achievement breaks new ground by taking the emerging field of synthetic biology beyond the limits...

  • Cancer study looks at organic diet

    Eating pesticide-free organic food does nothing to reduce a woman’s risk of cancer, a study has found. Researchers asked 600,000 women aged 50 or over whether they ate organic food and monitored their health for nine years. In total, around 50,000...

  • Study suggests autism begins ‘long before birth’

    A study that examined brains from children who died has bolstered evidence that something before birth might cause autism. Clusters of disorganised brain cells were discovered in tissue samples from brain regions important for regulating social...

  • Smoking bans cut premature births and child asthma attacks

    Banning smoking in public places has helped to cut premature births by 10 per cent, according to new research from the US and Europe. A study in The Lancet medical journal found that while the impact of anti-smoking laws varies between countries,...

  • WHO declares India free of polio

    The World Health Organisation has formally declared India to be polio-free, with no new cases of the disease detected in the country in the past three years. The WHO said that the milestone means it now considers the entire southeast Asian region,...

  • Scientist who discovered Ebola frustrated by Guinea outbreak

    Peter Piot was 27, newly qualified and working in a microbiology lab in Antwerp when he received a flask of human blood contaminated with a mysterious pathogen that had been killing people in the forests of Zaire. If he had known then what he was...

  • Polluted air linked to 7m deaths in 2012 – WHO

    Air pollution killed about seven million people in 2012, making it the world’s single biggest environmental health risk, the World Health Organisation said yesterday. The toll, a doubling of previous estimates, means one in eight of all global...

  • Better sleep ‘may prevent diabetes’

    Doctors should consider prescribing better sleep to ward off type 2 diabetes and obesity, say experts. Increasing evidence points to a link between poor sleep and common metabolic disorders, according to a new research review. Often sleep loss is...

Advert
Advert