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Health & Fitness

  • Men warned on testicular cancer

    A third of men admit to spending just under an hour primping and preening themselves each day, but the same number say they never bother to check for testicular cancer, a charity has warned. Balls To Cancer said despite the fact testicular cancer...

  • Warning on severe morning sickness

    Warning on severe morning sickness

    A significant number of women who suffer from a type of severe morning sickness experienced by the Duchess of Cambridge are expected to either put up with it or have an abortion, a report has claimed. Around 10,000 women are thought to suffer with...

  • Test: sit, rise and live long

    Have you ever checked the creases in your palm for a superstitious analysis of your life expectancy? Or perhaps a fortune teller has consulted a mystical crystal ball on your behalf for a prediction of your impending doom? As depressing as the...

  • Are you defiant?

    Are you defiant?

    Over the past couple of decades we have seen new categories of disorder. Some of these disorders would not have been classified in a medical category years ago and were just put down to the type of personality. Some categories have sprung up...

  • Rabies spread by dogs kills 60,000 each year

    Rabies spread by dogs kills 60,000 each year

    A British-led study has found almost 60,000 people die every year from rabies transmitted by dogs. The report is the first to consider the impact of canine-spread rabies in terms of deaths and the economic costs of the disease around the...

  • Epilepsy drug may help MS sufferers

    A drug commonly taken to prevent epilepsy seizures could be used to protect people from an eye condition that is often associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), research has found. Optic neuritis causes the nerves carrying information from the eye...

  • Pushy UK parents in ‘curbing enthusiasm’ to take part in exercise sport

    Pushy UK parents in ‘curbing enthusiasm’ to take part in exercise sport

    Pushy, abusive parents in the UK are turning children as young as 8 off sport, according to a poll. Youngsters report being told they are “too heavy”, “lazy to run” or have made a “pathetic mistake” by mums and dads who are highly critical of...

  • Drugs hope for tinnitus sufferers

    Drugs hope for tinnitus sufferers

    The first drugs to treat hearing conditions such as tinnitus (ringing in the ear) could be available in the next five years, according to a new report. The charity Action on Hearing Loss said that with five drugs already in the final stages of...

  • Divorce linked to heart attack

    Divorce linked to heart attack

    Women who have been divorced once, or men who have been divorced at least twice, are more likely to have a heart attack than people who get and stay married, according to a study. “The negative health consequences of divorce have been known for...

  • WHO demands disclosure of all clinical trial results

    The World Health Organisation has called for the release of clinical trial results for all drugs, vaccines and medical devices − whatever the result − in the latest salvo against the withholding of data. Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director...

  • Child stress ‘spikeschance of diabetes’

    Child stress ‘spikeschance of diabetes’

    Stressful life events in childhood such as death or illness in the family, divorce or separation, can triple the risk of developing type 1 diabetes, research has suggested. A study carried out in Sweden analysed more than 10,000 families with...

  • DNA test gives breast cancer ‘risk score’

    DNA test gives breast cancer ‘risk score’

    Scientists have been able to test how likely women are to develop breast cancer and give them a “risk score” by analysing their DNA. Researchers said that improving the accuracy of risk analysis using genetic screening could help breast cancer...

  • Shortness ‘linked to heart disease’

    As if being short was not already enough of a disadvantage, scientists have now confirmed it increases the risk of heart disease. In fact the more vertically challenged you are, the greater are your chances of having a dicky heart, according to...

  • Lifestyle changes are the answer

    Lifestyle changes are the answer

    There are many conditions caused by inflammation which, in turn, causes pain. Subsequently, we take painkillers. However, a study has shown that a sense of awe is as powerful as drugs for reducing inflammation. Spiritual feelings, or a sense of...

  • Want to keep fit? Go to sleep

    Want to keep fit? Go to sleep

    In promoting better health through physical activity, there are a wide range of exciting activities we could, and often do, discuss. From organised leisure sports to fitness classes, or even just working out at home alone, many activities have...

  • Do we know what we are eating?

    Do we know what we are eating?

    Charmaine Gauci, director at the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Directorate, says consumers may not be aware of what exactly is in the food they eat. Some ‘hidden’ constituents may lead to obesity and non-communicable diseases such as...

  • Cultivating healthy lifestyles

    Cultivating healthy lifestyles

    Lorraine Dimech Magrin and Anna Maria Gilson report on the various initiatives being taken at school level to promote healthier lifestyles among children, with a special focus on the role of home economics. Childhood obesity is on the rise in...

  • Making exercise much more fun

    Making exercise much more fun

    Helping children find activities they like is one of the keys to keeping them active. “It doesn’t matter what the activity is so long as they like it,” says Alan Pace, director of operations at children’s gym Spinach Fitness. Parents play an...

  • A new approach to dieting

    There may still be misconceptions about the Atkins diet which was launched in 1972 and wherein one could eat unlimited protein sources and limited vegetables. But the chief nutritionist for the New Atkins Nutritional Approach, Linda O’Byrne, says...

  • The silent killer

    The silent killer

    Obese people stand a higher chance of developing hypertension. Medical student Sahra Haji outlines how high blood pressure is measured, its causes, prevention and possible treatment. Have you heard of the silent killer? A disease so deadly you...

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