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Editorial

  • Dark side of the fireworks boom

    Village feasts are part of our social fabric. However, they can also tear the social fabric at the seams because feasts are increasingly looking less like the celebrations they are meant to be and morelike open-air concerts and parties. The...

  • In defence of VAT concessions

    When Malta negotiated membership of the EU more than a decade ago, it managed to obtain a very significant concession from Brussels allowing it not to charge VAT on foodstuffs and medicinal products. By so doing, it joined the UK and Ireland in...

  • Policies that change with the wind

    The European Commission report on Malta’s failure to reach renewable energy targets highlights the problem of setting policies in a small country. To be fair, Brussels has taken that into account and, whereas other member states have to derive 20...

  • Give social workers their due

    It’s not for nothing that social work has been called a ‘noble’ profession. If one can talk of a battle against the suffering brought about by life circumstances, social workers are in the trenches. They are at the frontlines on the margins of...

  • Loss of faith in persons of trust

    The announcement by civil service head Mario Cutajar that new regulations are to be drafted by the end of the year on the employment of persons of trust in government employ is very welcome news. There are over 500 people employed on a trust basis...

  • Keeping beaches clean and populism

    Malta’s limited land mass has its advantages, at least on paper. Commuting is contained and the infrastructure is more manageable. Moreover, the country’s size also contributes to a better quality of life and a greater sense of security. However,...

  • Leave politics out of court

    The government – as the system stands today – has few responsibilities greater than appointing members of the judiciary, who are supposed to be learned, upstanding and respected by the public at large. Since coming to power almost three years ago,...

  • Bring harmony back to the Bench

    In 1923, Lord Chief Justice Gordon Hewart, hearing the appeal filed by a motorcyclist, insisted that “it is not merely of some importance but is of fundamental importance that justice should not only be done but should manifestly and undoubtedly...

  • Ins and outs of EU-US trade deal

    When, in November 2011, US and EU leaders agreed to take action “to boost trade and revive stagnant economies on both sides of the Atlantic”, many believed the proposed new deal would be the medicine that the western economies needed to move out...

  • Information management pitfalls

    The Justice Minister had no problem publishing the inquiry report into last November’s nightclub incident in Paceville that left dozens injured, including minors. However, he acted differently in the case of October’s car show tragedy and...

  • Let the media follow MCESD

    A member of the Malta Council for Economic and Social Development complains that he was misreported by a section of the media and the social partners’ response was to close the doors to the media. For some time, reporters were allowed to cover the...

  • Signs of renaissance of Valletta

    After years of neglect, the restoration of several public buildings in Valletta is most heartening. There is growing awareness of the importance of preserving the national patrimony, at leastin so far as national monumentsare...

  • Quest for constitutional reform

    Just before the last election, Labour Party leader Joseph Muscat said he wanted to give birth to a Second Republic should he be elected to government. He won the election handsomely but the promised constitutional reform, or the constitutional...

  • A monumental judicial blunder

    It started off innocently enough on Wednesday morning when the Justice Ministry announced that the Cabinet had approved the appointment of two new magistrates, both women. The statement went on to give a statis­tical gender breakdown of judicial...

  • A service that the public deserves

    The public service suffers serious prejudice. It conjures up images of a bureaucratic nine-to-five mentality, overstaffed ministries operating in isolation and constant, almost secretive, filing. In recent years, the public service embarked on...

  • Editorial: He should have been stopped

    Editorial: He should have been stopped

    When Prime Minister Joseph Muscat called in the press to announce the ‘resignation’ of Michael Falzon as parliamentary secretary, following a damning report by the National Audit Office on the Gaffarena scandal, an unrepentant Dr Falzon said some...

  • Public perceptions and prison blues

    Corradino Correctional Facility is the Cinderella of the public service. It has been left by successive government administrations to bump along the bottom. Home affairs ministers have occasionally taken an initiative to make an improvement in,...

  • A helping hand for a helpline

    They are the helpers whose voice one hears but whose face one never sees. They are the first port of call for troubled souls, alleviating loneliness for a few moments, directing the depressed to professional help, raising the alarm on child abuse,...

  • Maybe just another brick in the wall

    The White Paper containing proposals to regulate those who sell properties is a step in the right direction but this move alone is unlikely to solve the problems in a sector that is so overheated. The document, spurred by real estate agents...

  • Bus service change needed at all levels

    Is it possible that Malta is back to square one with regard to the efficiency of the public transport system? Going by the regular loud and bitter complaints that have been aired by commuters in this newspaper and elsewhere, it looks like Arriva...

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