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Editorial

  • Can the Attorney General be silenced?

    Is the Attorney General a servant of the people or of government officials, including political appointees? The dilemma emerges every time that office is engaged in some controversy, as was the case recently when the government objected to the...

  • Editorial: The Mediterranean tragedy

    Editorial: The Mediterranean tragedy

    The persistent incidents involving asylum seekers at sea have often sadly been relegated to a footnote in news bulletins. But the tragedies of the past week should serve as a wake-up call for EU leaders to realise the Mediterranean has become a...

  • Internet addiction at the workplace

    The use of the internet has become so ubiquitous in our lives that few people can get by without checking their e-mails, reading online media reports or communicating on social networks. Many rightly conclude that, since the introduction of the...

  • Is suspending Schengen the answer?

    In the immediate wake of the recent atrocities in Paris, some politicians have called for the suspension of the Schengen Agreement, which abolished internal borders between signatory countries and allowed the free movement of persons between...

  • Need for tourism police long overdue

    Remember the time when timeshare touts on the Sliema front, Buġibba and other seaside places used to pester tourists so much that they used to write about it frequently in this newspaper? For a time, it appeared they could not be controlled. That...

  • Mepa’s proposed amnesties

    Malta’s record on corruption and lawlessness is poor. As the most recent Corruption Perception Index by Transparency International reports, the island lies at the bottom end of the European league-table, with a pass mark of just over 50 per cent,...

  • Valletta: the elephant in the room

    Is it not sad that when the eyes of the world are fixed on the atrocities being committed by Islamic State, when rival factions have led to anarchy in Libya, and when there are so many other ills that deserve closer attention, Malta luxuriates, as...

  • What demotivates civil servants most

    With one controversial issue after another stealing the headlines, few must have bothered to read reports of all that was said during the recent public service week about what the government expects of civil servants. People know exactly what they...

  • Hysteria can only cause harm

    The murder of Charlie Hebdo journalists. The terrorist attack on individuals at the Corinthia Hotel in Tripoli. The utterly grotesque torching of a Jordanian pilot presented as entertainment on the internet. These are all truly shocking and...

  • Last remnant of the Malta Railway

    The only surviving wagon that formed part of the Maltese railway has been transported for restoration from Ġnien l-Istazzjon (Station Gardens) in Birkirkara to an undisclosed “safe” location. Lately in the care of Birkirkara local council, for the...

  • Poverty among single mothers

    In a study of single parents in Malta entitled ‘Improving the Quality of Life of Lone Parents’, it was reported that 33 per cent of single mothers were raised in families that had themselves struggled with unemployment. Poverty is often an...

  • Pushing the boundaries beyond limits

    Rubbish scattered at various points along the Żonqor Point coastline does give the place a shabby image but would this be a good enough reason to turn the area into another Buġibba? Contrary to what property developer Sandro Chetcuti may want to...

  • The culture of binge drinking

    The conclusions of the draft Health Systems Performance Assessment – the first nationwide check-up of Malta’s health system – highlight that binge drinking is a worrying new phenomenon and that there is a “dire need” for an alcohol policy to be...

  • Fuel: consumer is getting a raw deal

    Why is the Malta Competition and Consumer Affairs Authority taking so long to look into fuel supply and prices? As the consumer watchdog, it is expected to work with greater efficiency, more so now that the government has had to bow to increasing...

  • No one should die in hospital corridor

    Dying in a hospital corridor for lack of space in a normal ward is most undignified, irrespective of any reason the hospital authorities may come up with. Absolutely no one would wish to have any member of his family or a relative die in a...

  • The souk and new Parliament

    When world-renowned architect Renzo Piano was commissioned to redesign the entrance to Valletta, he said it was “a public project about civic pride and civic sense”. While he was right to describe it as being about civic pride, it has always been...

  • Libya: our greatest security threat?

    Tuesday’s terrorist attack at the Corinthia Hotel in Tripoli has highlighted, once again, the worsening security situation in Libya, our backyard, which is threatening to spiral out of control and create a haven for jihadists. The motive for the...

  • A fresh injection of EU funding

    EU funds are helping to change the face of Malta. A noticeable improvement has already been made in a number of sectors, particularly infrastructure, and projects that are aimed at improving the quality of life. Malta receives more than it...

  • Things could be done better

    The public uproar that ensued when it emerged that foster care team leader John Rolé was to be transferred from Aġenzija Appoġġ to another department took the government so much by surprise that it swiftly reversed the decision. Mr Rolé will...

  • Amnesty for social benefit abusers

    With the government announcing yet another amnesty, this time for social benefit abusers, it would seem that what ought to be considered as an exception is being turned into an administrative rule. Amnesties are always likely to raise issues of...

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