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Editorial

  • Tourism: problems that never go away

    Politicians just love rolling out figures to substantiate the progress made in their particular fields. In taking the credit, they also often imply that the figures tell the whole story of success. It usually does not and it is refreshing...

  • Huge challenges in health service

    Though a touch bizarre, it is not difficult to see why Joseph Muscat chose to pass the health portfolio to Energy Minister Konrad Mizzi. He is young and energetic and has so far piloted the government’s energy programme with relative ease, though...

  • Editorial: Let’s (re)write Malta’s history

    It was certainly an eventful weekend for Joseph Muscat. He started it with a more comprehensive reshuffle than he could have contemplated 12 months ago (forcibly brought forward by Godfrey Farrugia’s resignation) and ended it with images of Nelson...

  • The regeneration of Valletta

    Becoming the European Capital of Culture in 2018 has provided Valletta with an opportunity, and a challenge, to derive cultural and economic benefits and to act as a catalyst for regenerating itself. The government has grasped that winning the...

  • Averting a constitutional crisis

    President George Abela’s refusal to sign the Civil Unions Bill into law would have caused a constitutional crisis had this not happened so close to the end of his presidency. This is the first time in the history of the Maltese Republic that a...

  • Curbing the high cost of dying

    While most people fret about the high cost of living, sooner or later most of us have to deal with the often exorbitant cost of burying a loved one. Some persons who recently have had to deal with excessive funeral expenses vented their...

  • The right fight for workers’ welfare

    Malta Employers Association president Arthur Muscat revealed some worrying news when he addressed the association’s recent annual general meeting. He said rivalry and “outright animosity” between trade unions was having an impact on...

  • Political language getting worse

    When the political language starts getting unduly intemperate, it is usually a sure sign of tension building up, either in relations between two or more opposing parties or in the country. The general election, won with a most handsome majority by...

  • Elderly care needs greater attention

    The rapidly growing elderly population in this country, as in most others in the EU and around the world, presents some formidable challenges. It will, as we have been made acutely aware, have a huge impact on public finances as pension and social...

  • Lessons from riot must be learned

    On February 25, the Parliamentary Immigration Committee arrived at the Ħal Far detention centre to carry out an assessment of irregular immigrants’ living conditions. But the visit was curtailed when a number of migrants caused a riot. Riot...

  • New Cold War is in nobody’s interest

    Russia’s intervention in Ukraine and its annexation of Crimea represents the most serious security crisis to erupt in Europe since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Russia has violated international law, defied the international community, damaged its...

  • Editorial: How free are we to speak?

    Most politicians did not attend Lord Judge’s illuminating lecture on human rights earlier this month. Shame, for they would have heard a masterful exposition by the former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales on a matter that should be close to...

  • Border chiefs’ warning on migration

    The EU’s border agency, Frontex, has reached the unsurprising conclusion that, given the political instability throughout North Africa but most especially in Libya and Egypt, this coming spring and summer will witness “high migration pressure” in...

  • After the police, the Attorney General

    In a leader entitled ‘Scandal of the historic Australia Hall’ last December, Times of Malta noted that there were certain things in society that belonged to all the people. “But there appears to be a perception among Maltese politicians,” the...

  • Putting GDP growth in proper context

    In its urge to fend off Nationalist Party criticism, Joseph Muscat’ s government is at times losing the sense of proportion that is required for a proper assessment of a given situation. It is true that the new government has contributed to inject...

  • Recognising a culture of poverty

    In one of her last initiatives before taking on her new duties as head of State, Social Solidarity Minister Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca launched a supplementary allowance scheme aimed to help raise some 22,000 children out of poverty. The grant...

  • China strengthens foothold in Med

    China, it seems, never forgets a good deed. In all that has been said so far about the planned Chinese investment in Malta’s energy set-up, it would also seem that the country has not stopped to think about what has possibly led China to decide to...

  • Politics and the civil service

    Yet again, the civil service is back on the government’s radar screen. It has already been once or twice before but it seems that those who are pushing for greater efficiency in the service are now getting a bit impatient. If there is a leadership...

  • State, government and party

    One hallmark of this Labour administration over the past year has been the blurring of the distinction between the State, the government and the ruling party. Taxpayers’ money, furthermore, has sometimes been used to fund events which in reality...

  • Why politicians will ignore Lockerbie truth

    When Jim Swire, father of one of the Lockerbie victims, visited Malta last November he told this newspaper the truth about the 1988 terrorist attack will one day come out. “The question is whether I will be in a box by then,” the indefatigable...

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