Advert

Norway’s wealth fund back on top form in 2012

Norway’s sovereign wealth fund, one of the world’s biggest investors, grew by around $100 billion (€76.9 billion) in 2012, sealing one of its best years on record as it benefited from the striking upturn by stock markets.

The fund has been steadily reducing its assets in Europe as part of a long-term plan to move into both emerging and developed markets in Asia and the Americas

Known as the ‘oil fund’, it invests revenue from Norway’s lucrative oil industry for the country’s future. It is now worth around $710 billion (€546.6 billion), 40 per cent more than the value of the entire Norwegian economy.

The fund has been steadily reducing its assets in Europe as part of a long-term plan to move into both emerging and developed markets in Asia and the Americas – where it sees the strength of the world’s economy in the years ahead.

At the end of last year it sharply cut its holdings of bonds issued by the Government of Britain and France, two countries struggling to reduce debt levels while their economies stutter.

But big gains in stock markets last year after major central banks acted to underpin their economies helped the fund return 13.4 per cent in 2012, the second best performance since it started operating in 1996.

The fund lost 2.6 per cent overall in 2011.

“The fund’s good performance is largely the factor of a good run on the stock markets,” Yngve Slyngstad, its chief executive said.

Managed by Norway’s central bank, the fund cut its exposure to Europe to 48 per cent of its total portfolio last year from 53 per cent. Instead, it put more into countries such as South Korea, Mexico, Australia and Japan, it said.

The fund reduced its holding of British government debt by 13 per cent in the fourth quarter. French government debt holdings fell by a quarter.

It lifted its share of Italian government debt to 26.5 billion Norwegian crowns from 24.8 billion, although this reflects a period prior the uncertainty caused by recent inconclusive elections in that country.

The fund also more than quadrupled its holding of Australian government debt.

It earned close to 30 per cent on investments in the financial sector, which also had the biggest weight in its portfolio with 23 per cent. Consumer goods, the second biggest segment within its share portfolio, also returned a hefty 24.5 per cent.

Advert

Comments are submitted under the express understanding and condition that the editor may, and is authorised to, disclose any/all of the above personal information to any person or entity requesting the information for the purposes of legal action on grounds that such person or entity is aggrieved by any comment so submitted.

At this time your comment will not be displayed immediately upon posting. Please allow some time for your comment to be moderated before it is displayed.

For more details please see our Comments Policy

Comments not loading? We recommend using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox with javascript turned on.
Comments powered by Disqus
Advert
Advert