Advert

Arctic oil spill plans ‘too vague’

Nations draft document but Greenpeace says it fails to address risks

Shell’s Kulluk oil rig ran aground in Alaska on December 31 and the US Coast Guard scrambled to prevent fuel from leaking. Photo: Reuters

Shell’s Kulluk oil rig ran aground in Alaska on December 31 and the US Coast Guard scrambled to prevent fuel from leaking. Photo: Reuters

Arctic nations’ plans to start cooperating over oil spills are vague and fail to define companies’ liability for any accidents in an icy region opening up due to global warming, environmentalists said yesterday.

The US Geological Survey estimates the remote region has 13 per cent of the world’s undiscovered oil and 30 per cent of its undiscovered gas

A 21-page document by the eight-nation Arctic Council, seen by Reuters and due to be approved in May, says countries in the region “shall maintain a national system for responding promptly and effectively to oil pollution incidents”.

It does not say what that means in terms of staff, ships, clean-up equipment or corporate liability in a remote region that the US Geological Survey estimates has 13 per cent of the world’s undiscovered oil and 30 per cent of its undiscovered gas.

The countries have drafted the document as companies including Royal Dutch Shell, ConocoPhillips, Lukoil and Statoil are looking north for oil despite high costs and risks. Shell’s Kulluk oil rig ran aground in Alaska on December 31 in near hurricane conditions.

“The document doesn’t get to grips with the risks of a spill in a meaningful way,” said Ruth Davis of Greenpeace, which passed the document to Reuters. Officials confirmed the text was genuine.

Greenpeace, which wants the Arctic to be off-limits to drilling, said it was “so vaguely written as to have very little practical value in increasing the level of preparedness”.

“We should be far beyond this rudimentary document,” echoed Rick Steiner, an environmental consultant and former professor at the University of Alaska often critical of the oil industry.

The Arctic Council – comprising the US, Russia, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Iceland and Denmark including Greenland – sees cooperation as big progress for the region, where sea ice shrank to a record low in the summer of 2012.

“There will be a lot of improvements compared to today – quite simply by making it much easier for countries in the Arctic to help each other when needed,” said Karsten Klepsvik, polar expert at Norway’s foreign ministry until end-2012.

The document, for instance, sets up 24-hour emergency contacts in the eight nations, seeks national rules to allow quick transport of clean-up equipment across maritime borders, better monitoring and joint training exercises.

Environment ministers from the Arctic Council are meeting in Jukkasjarvi, Sweden, between today and tomorrow, to discuss the draft.

The Arctic document makes clear it is non-binding, except for repayment of costs, when one country helps another. It says it is “subject to the capabilities of the parties and the availability of relevant resources”.

Global warming is making the Arctic region more accessible to shipping, mining and oil exploration. Oil spills could be extremely hard to clean up, perhaps trapped in or under ice that can be carried across international boundaries by ocean currents and winds.

Advert

Comments are submitted under the express understanding and condition that the editor may, and is authorised to, disclose any/all of the above personal information to any person or entity requesting the information for the purposes of legal action on grounds that such person or entity is aggrieved by any comment so submitted.

At this time your comment will not be displayed immediately upon posting. Please allow some time for your comment to be moderated before it is displayed.

For more details please see our Comments Policy

Comments not loading? We recommend using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox with javascript turned on.
Comments powered by Disqus
Advert
Advert