Advert

Egypt’s Morsi is sworn in as new President

An image grab from Egypt’s Nile TV shows Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi giving his first official presidential address at Cairo University yesterday after taking the oath of office. Photo: AFP

An image grab from Egypt’s Nile TV shows Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi giving his first official presidential address at Cairo University yesterday after taking the oath of office. Photo: AFP

Mohamed Morsi took the oath of office yesterday to become Egypt’s first Islamist president and its first elected head of state since Hosni Mubarak’s overthrow last year.

We support the Syrian people. We want the bloodshed to stop

The ceremony took place in the constitutional court rather than parliament, the result of an ongoing tussle with the military that took charge after Mubarak’s overthrow and insists on retaining broad powers now.

“I swear by the Almighty God to sincerely preserve the republican order and to respect the constitution and law, and completely care for the people’s interest,” he said at the ceremony at the court.

Morsi had wanted to take the oath before Parliament, but the military has disbanded the Islamist-dominated house following a court order.

In an address at Cairo University following his swearing-in, Morsi thanked the military for seeing through the presidential elections but pointedly mentioned the “elected parliament” several times.

“The elected institutions will return to fulfilling their roles. And the great military will devote itself to the task of protecting the country,” he told his audience, which included the military’s leader, Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi.

He then set out some of his international and domestic objectives, saying he would be a “servant of the people” in a “democratic, modern and constitutional state”.

Internationally, he said Egypt respected would back the Palestinians and called for an end to the bloodshed in Syria.

“I announce from here that Egypt, its people and presidential institution stand with the Palestinian people until they regain all their rights,” he said.

“We support the Syrian people. We want the bloodshed to stop,” he added. He repeated that Egypt would respect its international treaties, in an allusion to its 1979 peace accord with Israel.

“We carry a message of peace to the world, accompanied and preceded by a message of right and justice.”

Morsi, who resigned from the Muslim Brotherhood after winning the election last month, had spoken out forcefully in support of Palestinians during his campaign.

The Brotherhood is vehemently opposed to Syrian president Bashar al-Asad and supports the uprising against him.

But as President, Morsi is not expected to radically change his country’s foreign policy, especially towards Israel, in which the military is expected to exercise its clout.

In a Friday speech before tens of thousands of supporters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, the epicentre of the revolt that ousted Mubarak, he said he would insist on retaining all the presidency’s powers.

“I renounce none of the prerogatives of President,” he said. “You are the source of power and legitimacy,” he told his supporters.

“There is no place for anyone or any institution... above this will.”

The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces assumed parliament’s powers after disbanding it and formed a national security council headed by the President but dominated by the generals.

The military also reserves the right to appoint a new constituent assembly should the one elected by parliament be disbanded by a court decision expected on September 1.

The Muslim Brotherhood insists that only Parliament can appoint the assembly.

Advert

Comments are submitted under the express understanding and condition that the editor may, and is authorised to, disclose any/all of the above personal information to any person or entity requesting the information for the purposes of legal action on grounds that such person or entity is aggrieved by any comment so submitted.

At this time your comment will not be displayed immediately upon posting. Please allow some time for your comment to be moderated before it is displayed.

For more details please see our Comments Policy

Comments not loading? We recommend using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox with javascript turned on.
Comments powered by Disqus
Advert
Advert